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The Astronomers
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Space-Time And The Speed Of Light | Einstein's Relativity
 
05:43

Space-Time And The Speed Of Light | Einstein's Relativity

http://facebook.com/ScienceReason ... Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity (Chapter 3): Space-Time And The Speed Of Light The concept of spacetime combines space and time to a single abstract "space", for which a unified coordinate system is chosen. Typically three spatial dimensions (length, width, height), and one temporal dimension (time) are required. Dimensions are independent components of a coordinate grid needed to locate a point in a certain defined "space" --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceMagazine • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- SPACETIME In physics, spacetime (or space-time) is any mathematical model that combines space and time into a single continuum. Spacetime is usually interpreted with space being three-dimensional and time playing the role of a fourth dimension that is of a different sort from the spatial dimensions. According to certain Euclidean space perceptions, the universe has three dimensions of space and one dimension of time. By combining space and time into a single manifold, physicists have significantly simplified a large number of physical theories, as well as described in a more uniform way the workings of the universe at both the supergalactic and subatomic levels. In classical mechanics, the use of Euclidean space instead of spacetime is appropriate, as time is treated as universal and constant, being independent of the state of motion of an observer. In relativistic contexts, however, time cannot be separated from the three dimensions of space, because the observed rate at which time passes for an object depends on the object's velocity relative to the observer and also on the strength of intense gravitational fields, which can slow the passage of time. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spacetime --- GENERAL RELATIVITY Special relativity is a theory of the structure of spacetime. It was introduced in Albert Einstein's 1905 paper "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies" (for the contributions of many other physicists see History of special relativity). Special relativity is based on two postulates which are contradictory in classical mechanics: 1. The laws of physics are the same for all observers in uniform motion relative to one another (principle of relativity), 2. The speed of light in a vacuum is the same for all observers, regardless of their relative motion or of the motion of the source of the light. The resultant theory agrees with experiment better than classical mechanics, e.g. in the Michelson-Morley experiment that supports postulate 2, but also has many surprising consequences. Some of these are: * Relativity of simultaneity: Two events, simultaneous for one observer, may not be simultaneous for another observer if the observers are in relative motion. * Time dilation: Moving clocks are measured to tick more slowly than an observer's "stationary" clock. * Length contraction: Objects are measured to be shortened in the direction that they are moving with respect to the observer. * Mass-energy equivalence: E = mc2, energy and mass are equivalent and transmutable. * Maximum speed is finite: No physical object or message or field line can travel faster than light. The defining feature of special relativity is the replacement of the Galilean transformations of classical mechanics by the Lorentz transformations. (See Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism and introduction to special relativity). • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_relativity .

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:14 pm
Views: 1017 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Time Dilation and Length Contraction  [Modern Physics: 2nd Year University Tutoring]
 
10:23

Time Dilation and Length Contraction [Modern Physics: 2nd Year University Tutoring]

Special Relativity's most famous equations are those relating to time dilation and length contraction. This video goes over both equations and introduces you how to run through questions using them. We discuss muons being time dilated and space ships being length contracted. Reference for this information can be found in, Modern Physics, 3rd ed., by Serway, Moses, Moyer.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:14 pm
Views: 3448 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Michio Kaku - Time: 3 - Earthtime
 
59:45

Michio Kaku - Time: 3 - Earthtime

In this 4 part series, String Field Physicist Professor Michio Kaku will try and answer the question that many scientists, philosophers and free thinkers have asked and can never seem to answer: "What is time?" "Does time have substance?" "Does time have structure or dynamics" "Is time quantised?". Time is said to be the law which keeps all other forces in the universe from interacting all at once, However at the core of physics forces push, they do not pull, so what is pushing time?The Big Bang? And if so, what pushed the force that caused the Big Bang? It is a conundrum. Michio instead turns to the very fundamentals of what time is, what our sense of time is, what timing mechanisms exist in nature and how the universe operates, and how it needs to operate, in such a clockwork.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:14 pm
Views: 802 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Distance and Special Relativity: How far away is tomorrow?
 
01:22

Distance and Special Relativity: How far away is tomorrow?

Time is shorter than you think! Tweet it - http://bit.ly/rrfs4p Facebook it - http://on.fb.me/ny5lmc minutephysics is now on Google+ - http://bit.ly/qzEwc6 And facebook - http://facebook.com/minutephysics Minute Physics provides an energetic and entertaining view of old and new problems in physics -- all in a minute! In this episode we talk about distance in space and time and answer "How far away is tomorrow?" Music by Nathaniel Schroeder youtube: http://bit.ly/pakJLE myspace: http://mysp.ac/qtmZQj

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:14 pm
Views: 692 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

One-Minute Physics: Why past and future are the same
 
01:43

One-Minute Physics: Why past and future are the same

It's obvious that time has a direction: you were younger a decade ago than you are today. But according to the laws of physics, there is no intrinsic difference between the past and the future. In our latest One-Minute Physics animation, guest narrator Sean Carroll, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, explains why a better understanding of the big bang will help explain the arrow of time. New Scientist (c)

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:14 pm
Views: 712 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Physics / 100 Greatest Discoveries - Documentary [Full Length]
 
44:10

Physics / 100 Greatest Discoveries - Documentary [Full Length]

Discovery Channel | Scientists have transformed the way we think and live throughout the centuries. What are the most important scientific discoveries of all time? In no particular order, we present the top 100 in eight different categories.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:12 pm
Views: 754 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

What is Time? (Breakthrough Physics) 08
 
15:00

What is Time? (Breakthrough Physics) 08

"What is time?" The answer starts with this clip. John Nordberg is the world's expert on the physics of time. This is clip number 8 in his new science film, "Breakthrough Physics." This clip is the starting point within this film for the explanation of time. (Clips 8 through 13 explains time.) If you have ever wondered, "What is time?" then this is exactly what you have been looking for. John Nordberg was the first person to solve the mystery of time. Without a doubt, this film explains the mystery of time. Other topics are the grand unification of physics, and a new patented technique for hot fusion.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:12 pm
Views: 790 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

TEDxCaltech - Sean Carroll - Cosmology and the Arrow of Time
 
16:06

TEDxCaltech - Sean Carroll - Cosmology and the Arrow of Time

Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at Caltech.  He received his Ph.D. in 1993 from Harvard University, and has previously worked at MIT, the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the University of Chicago.  His research ranges over a number of topics in theoretical physics, focusing on cosmology, particle physics, and general relativity, with special emphasis on dark matter, dark energy, and the origin of the universe. He is the author of "From Eternity to Here," a popular book on cosmology and the arrow of time, and of "Spacetime and Geometry," a textbook on general relativity; has produced a set of introductory lectures for The Teaching Company entitled "Dark Matter and Dark Energy: The Dark Side of the Universe;" and is a co-founder of the popular science blog Cosmic Variance, http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cosmicvariance/. About TEDx, x = independently organized event: In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.) On January 14, 2011, Caltech hosted TEDxCaltech, an exciting one-day event to honor Richard Feynman, Nobel Laureate, Caltech physics professor, iconoclast, visionary, and all-around "curious character." Visit TEDxCaltech.com for more details.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:12 pm
Views: 1049 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Quantum Mechanics: Fabric of the Cosmos | NOVA Science Documentary
 
52:51

Quantum Mechanics: Fabric of the Cosmos | NOVA Science Documentary

"The Fabric of the Cosmos," a four-hour series based on the book by renowned physicist and author Brian Greene, takes us to the frontiers of physics to see how scientists are piecing together the most complete picture yet of space, time, and the universe. With each step, audiences will discover that just beneath the surface of our everyday experience lies a world we'd hardly recognize—a startling world far stranger and more wondrous than anyone expected. Brian Greene is going to let you in on a secret: We've all been deceived. Our perceptions of time and space have led us astray. Much of what we thought we knew about our universe—that the past has already happened and the future is yet to be, that space is just an empty void, that our universe is the only universe that exists—just might be wrong. Interweaving provocative theories, experiments, and stories with crystal-clear explanations and imaginative metaphors like those that defined the groundbreaking and highly acclaimed series "The Elegant Universe," "The Fabric of the Cosmos" aims to be the most compelling, visual, and comprehensive picture of modern physics ever seen on television.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:12 pm
Views: 658 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Michio Kaku - Time: 4 - Cosmic Time
 
58:46

Michio Kaku - Time: 4 - Cosmic Time

In this 4 part series, String Field Physicist Professor Michio Kaku will try and answer the question that many scientists, philosophers and free thinkers have asked and can never seem to answer: "What is time?" "Does time have substance?" "Does time have structure or dynamics" "Is time quantised?". Time is said to be the law which keeps all other forces in the universe from interacting all at once. However, at the core of physics forces push. They do not pull. So what is pushing time? The Big Bang? And if so, what pushed the force that caused the Big Bang? It is a conundrum. Michio instead turns to the very fundamentals of what time is, what our sense of time is, what timing mechanisms exist in nature and how the universe operates, and how it needs to operate, in such a clockwork.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:12 pm
Views: 723 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

What Is Time? Determinism, Quantum Physics, Consciousness, Information, Free Will, Causality...
 
31:18

What Is Time? Determinism, Quantum Physics, Consciousness, Information, Free Will, Causality...

Resolution: optimized for 640 x 360 (16:9 SD) http://crackingthenutshell.com/what-is-time/ Welcome to Cracking the Nutshell! In this video, I discuss the nature of time. Summary: - Newtonian time (absolute time) - Relativistic Time (Einstein) / The observer - Time dilation (Special Relativity Theory) - Muons / cosmic rays (half-life) - Philosophical Theories of Time: A and B theories (John McTaggart) - Presentism / Block Time - "Now" moment and consciousness (awareness of change) - Determinism and classical physics - Free will an illusion? - Is time linear? - Time as perception of duration, change and ordering of events - Time an illusion of consciousness? - Time enabling 3D physical perception of space - Universe whith no change and no perception - Individual time, intricately linked to awareness - Is time more fundamental than space? - Universe where only patterns of states exist and perception of change, hence time (but no 3D space) - Fundamental time (quantum of time): Planck time - Quantum gravity / Quantum universe simulations - Time fundamental (not emergent) - Renate Loll - Time and consciousness - Is there an objective reality out there? - Quantum physics / religion / philosophy / spirituality - Physics and New Age ideas - Consciousness as taboo (within Physics) - Brilliant minds in Quantum Physics: Einstein, Bohr, Schrödinger, Heisenberg, Wigner, Bohm, Wheeler, Feynman.... - Time from the Quantum Physics perspective - Probability distributions - Observation / Measurement / Retrieval of Information / Collapse of the wavefunction - Collapse of Determinism - Fundamental role of observer and "now" moment of time - Determinism and randomness - Arrow of time / Entropy / Causality / Deterministic equations of physics - Second Law of Thermodynamics / Disorder / Time direction - Is causality fundamental in our universe? - Free will and determinism - Consciousness and free will and illusion? - Schrödinger's equation and determinism - Non-local reality in the background (computing outside our space-time) - Flow of information between realities (or dimensions) - From determinism to randomness? Or is there another option? - Interaction between quantum world and consciousness / free will - Double-slit experiments - Information or knowledge fundamental? - Experiments that provide evidence of mind-matter interaction (consciousness or free will can influence the outcome of a probabilistic distribution) - Quantum random number generators - Helmut Schmidt - Free will debates - Purely linear physical causality? - Non-local realms, nested time / nested realities - Tom Campbell - Dogmatic believes within science - Can the present change the past? Retro-causality (backwards causality) - Delayed choice quantum eraser - Nature of time and arrow of time, when causality does not need to be linear nor confined to just our-space time - Reality linked to observation / Collapse of objective reality - Linear timeline in our space-time versus branching time-line in probability space - Retrieval of information (from probability space to our space-time) as key to understanding causality - Past and future databases / branching timeline - Reality as probabilistic + free will - Scientific method and science - Physics / Metaphysics / Philosophy References and other suggested videos / info: Philosophy theories of time: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zw6hS_gy9MY Renata Loll videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fv2gBjQ8xIo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACS1_5jyvHE Tom Campbell video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RMOGFaOLSQ Cracking the Nutshell website: http://crackingthenutshell.com

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:12 pm
Views: 1875 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

What is time? - professor Renate Loll, Utrecht University
 
12:06

What is time? - professor Renate Loll, Utrecht University

Professor Renate Loll (Utrecht University) talks about the question 'What is time' from the perspective of theoretical physics. Often contra-intuitive but always fascinating, Loll reveals the secrets of a quantum theory of time.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:12 pm
Views: 1720 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Theoretical - Philosophical Physics : Space and Time into a single Continuum
 
10:57

Theoretical - Philosophical Physics : Space and Time into a single Continuum

"Watch the Stars and From them Learn"-Albert Einstein Research @ http://www.youtube.com/sn1pe352 "Put your hand on a hot stove for a Minute, and it seems like an Hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an Hour, and it seems like a Minute. THAT'S RELATIVITY."-Albert Einstein "Apparently we are living in a Bose-Einstein Condensate in which all particles are immersed. If we turned it off, mass would vanish and everything would fly apart in a nanosecond," The first known philosopher Thales of Miletus taught that all things derive from a single first cause or Arche (Water) he also taught that the world is harmonious, and is intelligible to rational understanding I believe in Spinoza's God who reveals Itself in the orderly harmony of what exists"-Albert Einstein "Spinoza contended that everything that exists in Nature (i.e., everything in the Universe) is one Reality (substance) and there is only one set of rules governing the whole of the reality" This Paradigm is in line with James Clerk Maxwell's concept that the universe is existing in a dynamic medium that has many properties very much like those found in fluids such as water "According to the general theory of relativity space without aether is unthinkable." - A.Einstein, Sidelights on Relativity, 1922, page 23. "Fisk's model suggests that the magnetic field lines coming from the Sun look like a wild tornado" Michael Faraday (1791-1867) "I cannot conceive curved lines of force without the conditions of a physical existence in that intermediate space." James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) "...we cannot help thinking that in every place where we find these lines of force, some physical state or action must exist in sufficient energy to produce the actual phenomena." LOOK up at the sky. Almost everything out there is spinning around: stars, galaxies, planets, moons - they are all rotating. Yet physicists believe that the universe itself is not revolving. Why? There's countless numbers of physicist who think it is entirely possible that our universe is spinning on an axis. If these people are right, it could make understanding the universe a whole lot simpler. You could stop worrying about the big problems in cosmology: the origin of the big bang, the nature of dark energy and maybe dark matter too. You could get rid of the strange idea that the universe went through a superfast period of expansion known as inflation. You might even be able to halt the attempt to find a theory that marries together quantum theory and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Is it so hard to let the cosmos spin? Yes, it is, at least while general relativity rules the universe. In order to solve the hideously complex equations of general relativity - Einstein's theory of gravity - cosmologists assume that the universe is the same in every direction. Although general relativity can allow the universe to rotate, rotation requires an axis, and a cosmic axis of rotation would bestow a "special" direction on the universe - along the axis. Since there is no observational evidence that such a direction exists, the assumption has always been that the universe is not rotating. Mazur has a simple response to this: don't assume that general relativity has all the answers. Where do they get this heretical idea from? "From looking at where general relativity breaks down," Mazur says. General relativity provides an excellent description of what happens in the normal, day-to-day events in the universe, but it fails in "extreme" circumstances. Its equations are unable to tell us anything precise about events such as high-energy particle collisions, for instance, or the collapse of stars into black holes. Mazur and Chapline say, is in the way it allows time to break down. General relativity allows the formation of loops in time in certain circumstances. Sometimes, for instance, a kind of one-dimensional fault line in space-time known as a "cosmic string" can form. When such a string spins rapidly around an axis along its length, it creates a loop in time; travel round one of these "closed time-like curves" (CTCs) and you'll keep coming back to the same moment in time. Mazur and Chapline contend that, according to general relativity, the same thing can happen with a rotating black hole. The trouble is, quantum theory requires time to be "universal" - there should never be closed loops of time isolated from the time in the rest of the universe. That means quantum theory can't work everywhere in a universe governed by general relativity. relativity's view of space and time - what cosmologists call the vacuum - must be wrong. "There is but One universe, One Mind, One force, One substance. The substance, or body, of God is light. The substance of all 'created' things is light. Light is the living substance of Mind in action. Life is the pulsing, electro-magnetic oscillation of thinking mind."-Walter Russell

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:12 pm
Views: 2686 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Why quantum mechanics is so mysterious: Professor Jim Al-Khalili
 
16:38

Why quantum mechanics is so mysterious: Professor Jim Al-Khalili

Professor Jim Al-Khalili is one of the most important communicators of theoretical physics in the world today. He gave a talk to the IOP's Physics Communicators Group in London on the mysteries of quantum mechanics and how to explain it to the general public. http://www.iop.org/activity/groups/subject/physcom/index.html

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:09 pm
Views: 2204 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Prof Jim Al-Khalili - Alan Turing: Legacy of a Code Breaker
 
01:02:34

Prof Jim Al-Khalili - Alan Turing: Legacy of a Code Breaker

From cryptanalysis and the cracking of the German Enigma Code during the Second World War to his work on artificial intelligence, Alan Turing was without doubt one of the greatest minds of the 20th century. An extraordinarily gifted mathematician, he is rightly regarded as the father of computer science having set in place the formal rules that govern the way every computer code ever written actually work. This lecture will be a celebration of one man's enigmatic yet ultimately tragic life - a whirlwind tour of his genius, from whether computers can have consciousness to how a leopard gets its spots. Presented by Professor Jim Al-Khalili, Professor of Physics and Professor of Public Engagement in Science from the University of Surrey. Jim Al-Khalili OBE is an Iraqi-born British theoretical physicist, author and science communicator. He is Professor of Theoretical Physics and Chair in the Public Engagement in Science at the University of Surrey. He has become a familiar science personality in the British media. He has hosted several BBC productions about science and is a frequent commentator about science in other British media venues. This was a joint lecture between the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the University of Edinburgh School of Informatics. Recorded on Thursday 10 May 2012 at the George Square Lecture Theatre, The University of Edinburgh. Please note: the excerpts from the BBC documentary have been removed from this version of the lecture video due to copyright issues. You can see the full version of this lecture with the excerpts on our iTunesU channel (www.ed.ac.uk/about/video/itunesu)

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:09 pm
Views: 902 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Quantum Life: How Physics Can Revolutionise Biology: Jim Al-Khalili at TEDxSalford
 
18:13

Quantum Life: How Physics Can Revolutionise Biology: Jim Al-Khalili at TEDxSalford

Jim Al-Khalili is a professor of physics, author and broadcaster based at the University of Surrey where he holds a chair in the Public Engagement in Science. He is active as a science communicator and has written a number of popular science books, between them translated into over twenty languages. He is a regular presenter of TV science documentaries, including the Bafta nominated Chemistry: A Volatile History, and presents the weekly Radio 4 programme, The Life Scientific. He is a recipient of the Royal Society Michael Faraday medal and the Institute of Physics Kelvin Medal. He has also presented Atom, a three-part series for BBC Four, The Secret Life of Chaos, and Science and Islam, covering the leap in scientific knowledge that took place in the Islamic world between the 8th and 14th centuries. He's also a regular on Radio 4 and on the BBC's Horizon programme. Credits: Camerawork: Nathan Rae & Team - http://nathanrae.co.uk/ Post production: Elliott Wragg - https://twitter.com/EIliott Audio restoration : Jorge Polvorinos - http://jorgepolvorinos.wordpress.com Head of IT and Design: Vlad Victor Jiman - https://twitter.com/VladJiman Intro: Mike Wood - www.completeedits.co.uk https://twitter.com/completeedits

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:09 pm
Views: 558 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Jim Al-Khalili and the Quantum Robin
 
03:16

Jim Al-Khalili and the Quantum Robin

We've known for some time that certain animals can navigate the Earth using it's magnetic fields, but the methods by which they do this have remained largely unknown. However, an emerging field known as quantum biology is shedding light on this area and suggests that nature maybe taking advantage of quantum mechanics to develop its biological compass systems. Physicist Jim Al-Khalili looks at one bird in particular, the European Robin, and how this species of migratory bird may be relying on the strange rules of quantum entanglement to find its way south each year. Watch Jim's Friday Evening Discourse on the subject of Quantum Biology to find out more about the weird intersection between quantum mechanics and biology: http://bit.ly/X826sE The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://richannel.org/newsletter

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:09 pm
Views: 6336 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Double Slit Experiment explained! by Jim Al-Khalili
 
09:08

Double Slit Experiment explained! by Jim Al-Khalili

"If you can explain this using common sense and logic, do let me know, because there is a Nobel Prize for you.." Professor Jim Al-Khalili explains the experiment that reveals the "central mystery of quantum mechanics" - the double slit experiment. Watch the full lecture here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwgQVZju1ZM Sometimes called the "two-slit" or "Young's" experiment, it demonstrates that matter and energy can display the characteristics of both waves and particles, establishing the principle known as wave-particle duality. Furthermore, it questions the role of the observer in the outcome of events and demonstrates the fundamental limitation of an observer to predict experimental results. For this reason, Richard Feynman called it "a phenomenon which is impossible ... to explain in any classical way, and which has in it the heart of quantum mechanics. In reality, it contains the only mystery [of quantum mechanics]," (see more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-slit_experiment). The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://richannel.org/newsletter

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:09 pm
Views: 507 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Jim Al-Khalili: Is Time Travel Possible? Determinism, Relativity and the Arrow of Time (2011)
 
50:17

Jim Al-Khalili: Is Time Travel Possible? Determinism, Relativity and the Arrow of Time (2011)

Professor Jim Al-Khalili talks about whether time travel is possible at QED 2011 in Manchester. Music: Milton Mermikides Editor: Mike Hall

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:09 pm
Views: 402 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Jim Al-Khalili - Quantum Life: How Physics Can Revolutionise Biology
 
59:58

Jim Al-Khalili - Quantum Life: How Physics Can Revolutionise Biology

In this Friday Evening Discourse at the Royal Institution, Professor Jim Al-Khalili explores how the mysteries of quantum theory might be observable at the biological level. Although many examples can be found in the scientific literature dating back half a century, there is still no widespread acceptance that quantum mechanics -- that baffling yet powerful theory of the subatomic world -- might play an important role in biological processes. Biology is, at its most basic, chemistry, and chemistry is built on the rules of quantum mechanics in the way atoms and molecules behave and fit together. As Jim explains, biologists have until recently been dismissive of counter-intuitive aspects of the theory and feel it to be unnecessary, preferring their traditional ball-and-stick models of the molecular structures of life. Likewise, physicists have been reluctant to venture into the messy and complex world of the living cell - why should they when they can test their theories far more cleanly in the controlled environment of the physics lab? But now, experimental techniques in biology have become so sophisticated that the time is ripe for testing ideas familiar to quantum physicists. Can quantum phenomena in the subatomic world impact the biological level and be present in living cells or processes - from the way proteins fold or genes mutate and the way plants harness light in photosynthesis to the way some birds navigate using the Earth's magnetic field? All appear to utilise what Jim terms "the weirdness of the quantum world". The discourse explores multiple theories of quantum mechanics, from superposition to quantum tunnelling, and reveals why "the most powerful theory in the whole of science" remains incredibly mysterious. Plus, watch out for a fantastic explanation of the famous double slit experiment. Watch this video on the Ri Channel with additional learning materials: http://bit.ly/X826sE Friday Evening Discourses The tradition of Friday evening discourses at the Royal Institution was started by Michael Faraday in 1825. Since that time most major scientific figures have spoken in the famous Lecture Theatre at the heart of the Ri building at 21 Albemarle Street. Notable talks include Faraday announcing the existence of the technology of photography in 1839 and J.J. Thomson announcing the existence of the fundamental particle later called the electron in 1897. The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://richannel.org/newsletter

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:09 pm
Views: 634 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Order and Disorder - Information
 
59:03

Order and Disorder - Information

The Story of Information (S01E02) Professor Jim Al-Khalili investigates one of the most important concepts in the world today - information. He discovers how we harnessed the power of symbols, everything from the first alphabet to the electric telegraph through to the modern digital age. But on this journey he learns that information is not just about human communication, it is woven very profoundly into the fabric of reality.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:07 pm
Views: 476 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

BBC Horizon Order And Disorder With Jim AI.Khalili EP01
 
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BBC Horizon Order And Disorder With Jim AI.Khalili EP01

BBC Horizon Order And Disorder With Jim AI.Khalili episode 1 Professor Jim Al-Khalili investigates one of the most important concepts in the world today - information. He discovers how we harnessed the power of symbols, everything from the first alphabet to the electric telegraph through to the modern digital age. But on this journey he learns that information is not just about human communication, it is woven very profoundly into the fabric of reality.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:07 pm
Views: 3839 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Isaac Asimov about Overpopulation
 
02:08

Isaac Asimov about Overpopulation

"Human dignity cannot survive it. Convenience and decency cannot survive it. As you put more and more people into the world, the value of life not only declines, it disappears. It doesn't matter if someone dies." - Isaac Asimov

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:04 pm
Views: 395 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Dr Neil DeGrasse Tyson - The Amazing Meeting 6
 
01:28:31

Dr Neil DeGrasse Tyson - The Amazing Meeting 6

1:30 Laser Pointer Stand off 16:36 Prayer and Cancer..... 19:50 Swami Levitation..... 24:11 MARS Virus..... 27:00 Fear Of Numbers..... 29:08 Naming Rights..... 38:15 Jury Duty 1..... 41:01 Jury Duty 2 (Cocaine)..... 52:34 Islam's Fall..... 57:10 Religion and Science 1:02:50 Intelligent Design 1:03:30 Stupid Design (classic) 1:05:10 Birth of Atheism 1:07:30 Religion among scientist 1:12:26 Bible in the Classroom 1:15:49 Einstein and God put to rest! Astrophysicist and science communicator Neil deGrasse Tyson presents the keynote address at TAM6. His "brain droppings" cover everything from UFO abductions to 13th floors to jury duty. Dr. Tyson is the host of NOVA scienceNOW on PBS, and has been a frequent guest on The Daily Show and The Colbert Report. His presentation from TAM6 is one of the most entertaining presentations from any Amaz!ng Meeting.

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:04 pm
Views: 243 | Comments: 0 | Rating: Not yet rated

Isaac Asimov's A Feeling of Power
 
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Isaac Asimov's A Feeling of Power

Richard North's Film Version of Isaac Asimov's short story from the Anthology 'Nine Tomorrows'

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Added: April 6, 2013, 4:04 pm
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