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The AstronomersAstronomy
Videos with tag Astronomy
Results 1-25 of 110
 
07:42
07:42
07:42

Which telescope to buy?

Below are some of the telescopes I've used in recent years, ranging from ~30 -3000 dollars. (shortened for YTs character limits) Price $35 76mm reflector dobsonian mounted (Celestron Firstscope) Weight ~ 1kg (a couple of pounds) Setup time ~0 East of Transport 1 Short focal length- wide angle field of view. Finder not really necessary. Ultra cheap, good views of Moon, Jupiter Venus, rings of Saturn, bright, wide separation double stars, and brighter deep sky objects such as M13. I was not particularly impressed with the optics on mine, but for 35 bucks, you cant complain too much! Price $200 90mm Maksutov-Cassegrain, dobsonian mount (Orion Apex) Weight ~ 1kg (a couple of pounds) Setup time ~0 East of Transport 1 Longer focal length means smaller field of view for comparable eye pieces. I was impressed with this scope on the planets. It vastly outperforms the Firstscope on optics. The scope comes off the dobsonian mount on a quick release and can be mounted as a spotter scope (the main reason I got it). The dobsonian mount here (one arm) is exactly the same as the mount for the Firstscope. These are sort of the poor mans refractor. Great views of Moon and all the bright planets. Picked out Titan (brightest moon of saturn) with ease. I got this telescope for two reasons, firstly for outreach, in that you can just grab it and point it in seconds, zero setup time. Secondly I can mount it piggyback on the CPC11 (see below) and use it as a spotting/ guide scope. The Maksutov has the 'nice' feature that its a closed tube(helps keep dust out). The Mak. will have the edge on planets/ guidescope etc due to its longer focal length, but the Newtonian will be more all around bang for the buck. Price $600 10in Newtonian reflector, dobsonian mount (Celestron Starhopper) Weight ~ 15kg (~30lbs) Setup time ~10 mins to carry parts outside, 10 mins + cool down. East of Transport: Telescope is about the size of a small child (although not that heavy). It is big and awkward. Difficult to handle for the small. Almost the biggest telescope you can fit in a compact car (the reason I got it). The long open optical train requires periodic alignment (columniation) if it is frequently transported. Powerful deep-sky scope. Near zero photographic potential, but fantastic views of nebula, globular clusters and galaxies. Great scope for planets too. At this size the moon is getting too bright to look at for any length of time. Like most big newtonians, short focal ratio, which pragmatically means you get quite wide angle views. Again well suited to deep sky observing. Price $1500 90mm (3.5in) Stellarvue apochromat, -no mount, tube only (Apo Triplet) Weight ~ 4kg (~8lbs) East of Transport: The telescope is small and easy to transport. Comes with a bag that will go on an airplane as hand baggage. Worth the price for the aperture? Probably not unless you are in a fairly specific niche. This makes a great wide angle lenses for guided photography. As a guidescope its focal length is kind of short. That basically means the field of view for a given eye piece is wide. You need a very short focal length eye piece to get good magnification. I found myself using a 4mm eyepiece to look at planets, and even at that the image was small. As a finder scope though, that wide field is great. The other thing that these scope gives is absolutely beautiful stellar images. The stars just fall into incredible pin pricks. Beautiful contrasty flat views. I found the use of the short focal length eyepieces annoying for planetary use. Lacks the light gathering for versatility as a deep sky instrument. I only really ever used this as a piggybacker for the CPC11 below. Price $2800 11in Schmidt Cassegrain, driven goto alt-az fork mount (CPC11) Weight ~ 30kg (~65lbs) and thats just the top section. Tripods another 15 kg I think. Setup time ~30 mins to carry parts outside and align, 20 mins + cool down. East of Transport: It will fit in a compact car. To carry the telescope any distance really isnt an option unless you are strong. The ergonomic design is very good though. I always found mounting up the scope a bit of a bitch. Aligning it is relatively easy as the scope mount has a GPS in it that means you dont have to plug in these numbers and the time. Alignment is quite easy. I found the scope slips relatively easily unless the clutches are done up very tight. The scope can carry quite a burden (although of course when the scope weights this much extra, it does need to be well balanced). At this level it is an excellent photographic platform. It yields amazing views of almost everything. It's photographic potential is probably as good as you can get from a portable platform. This is the instrument I used to do the full rotation of Jupiter, although there the primary limitation was the stability of the sky.

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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11:33
11:33
11:33

Inside the Isaac Newton Telescope - Deep Sky Videos

Behind the scenes at the Isaac Newton Telescope, on La Palma, Canary Islands. Filmed and narrated by Brady Haran. With thanks to Rafael Barrena who was operating the telescope. Extra comments from Professor Mike Merrifeld, University of Nottingham. Our thanks to the Isaac Newton Group of telescopes for hosting us at La Palma and supplying many of the images. http://www.ing.iac.es/ (Special thanks to Javier Mendez at the ING) Extra images supplied by Caren Park (www.parkgallery.org), Iain Macaulay and David Brander from URN Science Show. Deep Sky Videos website: http://www.deepskyvideos.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DeepSkyVideos Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DeepSkyVideos Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/68847473@N02/ More about the astronomers in our videos: http://www.deepskyvideos.com/pages/contributors.html Videos by Brady Haran

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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02:41
02:41
02:41

Meade LX200 Telescope - What can you see...

Telescope - Meade LX200 - what can you see with a 10" from Eastchurch on the Isle of Sheppey. Kent. UK. Also see "LX200 - Observatory" for more detail of how it works... All images by Peter Bruce Eastchurch Gap. This video sounded better with original Enya music but had to change due to copyright - shame. Images taken with Webcam, Cannon EOS, Starlight Xpress MX7C, Meade DSI 1 & DSI 3 & Astrovid camera's. I wish we could all "see" with our own eyes the pictures shown here but our eyes are not very sensitive at low light levels but what is importance is the fact you can see the sights with a modest set-up. And the night sky is God given and free to view - Best TV in the world...

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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03:06
03:06
03:06

The Hubble Space Telescope is Back and Better Than Ever!

By popular demand, I've created a high definition montage of the latest images released from the upgraded Hubble Space Telescope. Many Space Fans out there wanted a montage of just the music and animations. Well, your wish is my command. Enjoy the eye candy! The Hubble Space Telescope now has a new Wide Field Camera, a repaired Advanced Camera for Surveys and two new spectrographs, making this telescope into an entirely different instrument than it was before. We have so much to look forward to now; an entirely new generation of images will be pouring out of this thing - what I'm showing here is just the beginning. At first, I was against repairing the HST, I wanted resources put into the James Webb Telescope, I'm glad no one listened to me! All animations/video are courtesy NASA/ESA and can be obtained here: http://www.hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2009/25/full/ I purchased the rights to use this music from AudioSparx (thanks for the donations Space Fans, it's what made this possible!) and can be found here: Celtic Dawn: http://www.audiosparx.com/sa/summary/play.cfm/sound_iid.239916 Techno Galactica: http://www.audiosparx.com/sa/summary/play.cfm/sound_iid.277201

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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01:47
01:47
01:47

Mars, Saturn & Jupiter through my telescope

Some of my videos of Mars, Saturn and Jupiter through my telescope, and the images that I process from them. FAQ's: Q. What is the music? A. Rhian Sheehan, Standing in Silence album, Part 8 Q. What equipment did you use? A. Orion XT10i (10" refelector) telescope, NEQ6 Pro motorized mount, Imaging Source DMK41AF02 astronomy camera, Astronomik Type II LRGB filterset, 2x barlow lens, laptop for mount control and image capture. Q. How much did the equipment cost? A. Total cost about $5500 (NZD). There is considerable extra cost involved in getting this equipment imported from the US to New Zealand, and of course we have to buy through dealers who have to make a profit too. If you are buying within the US, you can expect to pay a LOT less. Q. What is the magnification? A. To calculate this is focal length of telescope divided by diagonal chip size of camera... 1200mm / 8mm = 150x magnification. But I also used a 2x barlow, so 150 x 2 = 300x magnification. There have been several questions and confusion about our own galaxy, the Milky Way, which can be seen in one of my images. For those who are interested, have a look at this video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOazBTHzRYA

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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07:15
07:15
07:15

Extremely Large Telescope - A Home For The E-ELT

Science & Reason on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/ScienceReason ESOcast 16: E-ELT Site Chosen. On 26 April 2010, the ESO Council selected Cerro Armazones as the site for the planned 42-metre European Extremely Large Telescope. Cerro Armazones is an isolated mountain at 3060 metres altitude in the central part of Chile's Atacama Desert, some 130 kilometres south of the town of Antofagasta and about 20 kilometres away from Cerro Paranal, home of ESOs Very Large Telescope. --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceMagazine • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- "This is an important milestone that allows us to finalise the baseline design of this very ambitious project, which will vastly advance astronomical knowledge," says Tim de Zeeuw, ESOs Director General. "I thank the site selection team for the tremendous work they have done over the past few years." ESOs next step is to build a European extremely large optical/infrared telescope (E-ELT) with a primary mirror 42 metres in diameter. The E-ELT will be "the worlds biggest eye on the sky" — the only such telescope in the world. ESO is drawing up detailed construction plans together with the community. The E-ELT will address many of the most pressing unsolved questions in astronomy, and may, eventually, revolutionise our perception of the Universe, much as Galileo's telescope did 400 years ago. The final go-ahead for construction is expected at the end of 2010, with the start of operations planned for 2018. The decision on the E-ELT site was taken by the ESO Council, which is the governing body of the Organisation composed of representatives of ESOs fourteen Member States, and is based on an extensive comparative meteorological investigation, which lasted several years. The majority of the data collected during the site selection campaigns will be made public in the course of the year 2010. http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1018/ .

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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06:46
06:46
06:46

Hubble Space Telescope - Better Than Ever!

Science & Reason on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/ScienceReason The Hubble Space Telescope Is Back - Better Than Ever! Final Servicing Mission. --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.YouTube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.YouTube.com/ScienceMagazine • http://www.YouTube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.YouTube.com/FFreeThinker --- "Improved Hubble Shows Evidence of Dark Matter" • http://www.youtube.com/user/tdarnell#play/uploads/2/3wluv08tDhU • http://www.deepastronomy.com/ "When Hubble Opened its New Eyes" • http://www.youtube.com/AndromedasWake • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bytNgT7l8k "The Hubble Space Telescope - Rebirth of an Icon (Hubblecast 30)" • http://www.youtube.com/ESOcast • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hjy7YSIH-GI --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a space telescope that was carried into orbit by the space shuttle in April 1990. It is named after the American astronomer Edwin Hubble. Although not the first space telescope, the Hubble is one of the largest and most versatile, and is well-known as both a vital research tool and a public relations boon for astronomy. The HST is a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency, and is one of NASA's Great Observatories, along with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Space telescopes were proposed as early as 1923. The Hubble was funded in the 1970s, with a proposed launch in 1983, but the project was beset by technical delays, budget problems, and the Challenger disaster. When finally launched in 1990, scientists found that the main mirror had been ground incorrectly, severely compromising the telescope's capabilities. However, after a servicing mission in 1993, the telescope was restored to its intended quality. Hubble's orbit outside the distortion of Earth's atmosphere allows it to take extremely sharp images with almost no background light. Hubble's Ultra Deep Field image, for instance, is the most detailed visible-light image ever made of the universe's most distant objects. Many Hubble observations have led to breakthroughs in astrophysics, such as accurately determining the rate of expansion of the universe. The Hubble is the only telescope ever designed to be serviced in space by astronauts. There have been five servicing missions, the last occurring in May 2009. Servicing Mission 1 took place in December 1993 when Hubble's imaging flaw was corrected. Servicing missions 2, 3A, and 3B repaired various sub-systems and replaced many of the observing instruments with more modern and capable versions. However, following the 2003 Space Shuttle Columbia accident, the fifth servicing mission was canceled on safety grounds. After spirited public discussion, NASA reconsidered this decision, and administrator Mike Griffin approved one final Hubble servicing mission. STS-125 was launched in May 2009, and installed two new instruments and made numerous repairs. The latest servicing should allow the telescope to function until at least 2014, when its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), is due to be launched. The JWST will be far superior to Hubble for many astronomical research programs, but will only observe in infrared, so it will complement (not replace) Hubble's ability to observe in the visible and ultraviolet parts of the spectrum. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Space_Telescope .

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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03:24
03:24
03:24

How to Buy a Telescope : Telescope Buying Guide: Refracting Telescopes

A refracting telescope is the most common kind of telescope. Discover the difference between refracting and reflecting telescopes in this free video on home astronomy from a telescope salesperson. Expert: Jesse Sturgeon Bio: Jesse Sturgeon has served as a sales and customer service representative for Anacortes Telescope in Anacortes, Wash. for several years. He enjoys introducing people to the science & art of astronomy. Filmmaker: Curtis Enlow

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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06:42
06:42
06:42

Hubble's Successor: The James Webb Space Telescope

http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... Science@ESA (Episode 4): Following The Redshift (Part 2) - Hubble's Successor: The James Webb Space Telescope. In this fourth episode of the Science@ESA vodcast series Rebecca Barnes will identify some of the key discoveries achieved with the famous Hubble Space Telescope, look at the concept of redshift, and meet a new telescope that will be used to uncover the early Universe. --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- Named in 2002 in honour of NASA's administrator during the Apollo programme, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) mission is a collaborative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. JWST will address many of the outstanding issues of modern astronomy related to the 'Early Universe' and is expected to yield scientific breakthroughs as did its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be a general-purpose observatory with a suite of astronomical infrared-sensitive instruments. Compared to existing or planned observatories, JWST will have the unique advantage of combining superb image quality throughout a wide wavelength range, a wide field of view and unparalleled photon sensitivity due to its 6.5-metre diameter telescope primary mirror. http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=29 --- The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a planned infrared space observatory, the partial successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope. The JWST will not be a complete successor, because it will not be sensitive to all of the light wavelengths that Hubble can see. The main scientific goal is to observe the most distant objects in the universe, those beyond the reach of either ground based instruments or the Hubble. The JWST project is a NASA-led international collaboration with contributors in fifteen nations, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). Originally called the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), it was renamed in 2002 after NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb (1906-1992). Webb had headed NASA from the beginning of the Kennedy administration through the Johnson administration (1961-68), thus overseeing all the manned launches in the Mercury through Gemini programs, until just before the first manned Apollo flight. Current plans call for the telescope to be launched on an Ariane 5 rocket in June 2014, on a five-year mission (10 year goal). The JWST will reside in solar orbit near the Sun-Earth L2 point, which is on a line passing from the Sun to the Earth, but about 1.5 million km farther away from the Sun than is the Earth. This position, which moves around the Sun in exact orbital synchrony with the Earth, will allow JWST to shield itself from infrared from both Sun and Earth, by using a single radiation shield positioned between the telescope and the Sun-Earth direction. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Webb_Space_Telescope .

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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12:39
12:39
12:39

Telescopes, Galileo to SLOOH

http://slooh.com This video looks at Galileo's important work with the first telescope and includes an overview of the SLOOH robotic telescopes. Robotic telescopes are accessed and controlled using the Internet an incredible evolution of technology from Galileo's first telescopes

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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05:42
05:42
05:42

The Day Galileo Changed The Universe

Astronomy Magazine editor Dave Eicher talks about Galileo and the invention of the telescope.

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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04:26
04:26
04:26

Galileo Galilei

Requiem for a dream with pictures of astronomy, Galilei's home, and Galilei himself.

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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08:20
08:20
08:20

The Pendulum and Galileo

Purchase: http://hilaroad.com/video/ Galileo's investigation of the pendulum played a role in the evolution of science. He performed some of the first experiments while discovering the relationship among length, mass and displacement. If you are teaching the scientific method, the pendulum is a good project to start with. Galileo probably gained insight into many issues around motion from his investigation of the pendulum. The video also mentions issues with the church and academia.

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 1760 days ago by Ordonomundi

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02:25
02:25
02:25

Spectacular Solar Tornado.

Awesome sauce!

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by deek

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00:52
00:52
00:52

5-Times Size of Earth: Giant Solar Tornado Caught In Rare NASA Tape

A giant solar tornado - five times the Earth's diameter - swirling at incredible speed of some 186,000 mph has been captured on video by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. This is the first time giant solar twister has been caught on video. Solar tornadoes, known as solar prominences, are shaped by the sun's magnetic field and often occur during coronal mass ejections -- huge explosions of solar plasma. The speed of swirling solar gases can sometimes reach several thousand miles per hour. This 124,000-mile-tall tornado was filmed on September 25, 2011, but the video was only released to the public at the National Astronomy Meeting in Manchester (UK) on Thursday. Xing Li, an astronomer at Aberystwyth University in Wales, believes the finding is a "real gem of an event to fire the imagination, and it is a good way to study magnetic structures in the sun's atmosphere." Scientists believe that study of solar tornadoes will help understand the causes of space storms in general, which is still one of the great mysteries of our solar system.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1760 days ago by deek

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03:43
03:43
03:43

Tornado causes a storm on the Sun

A solar twister many times as wide as the Earth has been filmed in action by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Astronomy Now speaks to the scientists who spotted this amazing phenomenon.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1814 days ago by deek

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00:52
00:52
00:52

Huge 'Tornado' Churns on Sun's Surface - Close-Up Video

A circular storm as wide as five Earths was captured churning on the Sun's surface on Sept. 25, 2011, by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft. Time-lapsed multiple filter views are looped in this video. - Original Music by Mark C. Petersen, Loch Ness Productions

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1814 days ago by deek

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03:55
03:55
03:55

Astronomy: Birth, Life, and Death of a Star

Astronomy project outlaying the stages of Star Life and Stellar Evolution. Original music composed by Brandon Sodhi, Footage compiled by Shiva Mahakali. Sources: Google Images, NASA Images, Hubble Images, Chandra Images, The Universe Series.

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1817 days ago by deek

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02:26
02:26
02:26

Stellar Nights Trailer: Constellations, Astrology, Astronomy, and more . . .

A new on-line story telling program is coming soon in 2012. Topics to be covered include the constellations, zodiac, astrology, astronomy, space probes, history and the latest discoveries about the universe. Hosted by Hoku Kane, your ambassador to the stars. Sponsored by Stars Above Hawaii and the Stellar Express Moonlight Cafe.

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1817 days ago by deek

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04:46
04:46
04:46

Instant Replay of Stellar Eruption

Astronomers are watching the astronomical equivalent of an instant replay of a spectacular outburst from the unstable, behemoth double-star system Eta Carinae, which was initially seen on Earth nearly 170 years ago. Astrophysicists affiliated with UC Santa Barbara and Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) contributed to the study. Read more at Futurity:

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1817 days ago by deek

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02:50
02:50
02:50

Seeing the Future in the Stars - HubbleSite.org

Astronomers use Hubble images of the giant star cluster Omega Centauri to predict where the stars will be in a decade or more. The cluster's 10 million stars, among the first stars to form in the universe, are in constant motion. Studying their movements helps scientists to understand the formation of the universe. This video is from HubbleSite, the online home of the Hubble Space Telescope. Learn more about this topic. See the news release. http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2010/28/ See images of star cluster Omega Centauri. http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2010/28/image/ http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2001/33/image/a/ Get Omega Centauri wallpaper. http://hubblesite.org/gallery/wallpaper/pr2009025q/ Print an Omega Centauri picture. http://hubblesite.org/gallery/printshop/ps48/

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1817 days ago by deek

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26:33
26:33
26:33

Origins - Science: The Whole Story with Dr. Danny Faulkner

Christian Influence Upon Science Danny R. Faulkner Biographical info: Danny R. Faulkner has a B.S. in math from Bob Jones University, an M.S. in physics from Clemson University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in astronomy from Indiana University. Dr. Faulkner has been on the faculty of the University of South Carolina, Lancaster, since 1986, where he holds the rank of professor and teaches astronomy and physics. His research interests include stellar astronomy, especially binary stars. He has been published in the Astronomical Journal, Astrophysical Journal, the Publication of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and the Information Bulletin on Variable Stars. Creationist Astronomer Ph.D. and M.A. in Astronomy, Indiana University M.S. in Physics from Clemson University B.S. in Math from Bob Jones University Professor at the University of South Carolina, Lancaster (physics and astronomy) Associate Professor of Astronomy at the Institute for Creation Research Graduate School Published more than two dozen papers in various astronomy and astrophysics journals Dr. Faulkner's webpage at the University of South Carolina-Lancaster: http://usclancaster.sc.edu/faculty/faulkner/ Chair, Division of Math, Science, Nursing & Public Health Professor of Astronomy/Physics For more Origins episodes, go here: http://www.ctvn.org/programs-origins.asp

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1817 days ago by deek

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03:39
03:39
03:39

Astronomy 001 Video 15 - Parallax

An introduction to Stellar Parallax, brought to you by PSU UP campus course Astronomy 001, Section 005.

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1817 days ago by deek

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00:48
00:48
00:48

Stellar-mass black hole discovered

Our astronomers have detected a stellar-mass black hole in another galaxy, much further away than any other previously known. With a mass above fifteen times that of the sun, this is the second most massive black hole of this type ever discovered. This animation shows how the stellar black hole NGC 300 X-1 might look. Note: there is no audio in this video. Full story at: http://www.shef.ac.uk/mediacentre/2010/1481.html Department of Physics and Astronomy: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/physics/ Credit: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2/P. Crowther/L. Calçada.

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1817 days ago by deek

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26:32
26:32
26:32

Origins - Design in Astronomy with Dr. Danny Faulkner

Danny Faulkner is a creation scientist and educator specialized in Astronomy and Physics currently teaching at the University of South Carolina Lancaster.[1] He has been extensively involved in creation science, serving on the board of directors of the Creation Research Society since 2005.[2] He is also a prolific author, having published a great many articles in secular astronomy journals as well as creationist publications wherein he presents the view of our solar system with all its planets and stars through a biblical perspective. Danny has also written a book on creation cosmology called Universe by Design, and been featured on two educational documentaries. Dr. Faulkner acquired his B.S. in math at Bob Jones University, Greenville, SC in 1976, and later obtained an M.S. in physics in 1979 at the Clemson University, Clemson, SC, and his M.A. in astronomy(1983) along with his PhD in astronomy(1989) at the Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. [3] Danny's primary research interest is stellar astronomy wherein he has done significant studies on Binary Star systems.[4] Visit http://creationwiki.org/Danny_Faulkner to see Dr. Faulkner's publications & other info. About Origins: OriginsWatch as scientists, researchers and authors share relevant facts and thought-provoking evidence supporting creation. Join us for Cornerstone TeleVision's unique program entitled, ORIGINS, and then decide for yourself the truth about your human origins. Website: www.ctvn.org -------------------------------------------- http://originstv.blip.tv/file/4859778/has an icon that leads you this page http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ which says: You are free: to Share — to copy, distribute and transmit the work Under the following conditions: Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). Noncommercial — You may not use this work for commercial purposes. No Derivative Works — You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work. Notice — For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do this is with a link to this web page (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1817 days ago by deek

Views: 21234 | Comments: 0

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