Deprecated: mysql_connect(): The mysql extension is deprecated and will be removed in the future: use mysqli or PDO instead in /home/theastro/public_html/include/vshare.php on line 7
The AstronomersStars
Videos with tag Stars
Results 1-25 of 34
 
07:42
07:42
07:42

Which telescope to buy?

Below are some of the telescopes I've used in recent years, ranging from ~30 -3000 dollars. (shortened for YTs character limits) Price $35 76mm reflector dobsonian mounted (Celestron Firstscope) Weight ~ 1kg (a couple of pounds) Setup time ~0 East of Transport 1 Short focal length- wide angle field of view. Finder not really necessary. Ultra cheap, good views of Moon, Jupiter Venus, rings of Saturn, bright, wide separation double stars, and brighter deep sky objects such as M13. I was not particularly impressed with the optics on mine, but for 35 bucks, you cant complain too much! Price $200 90mm Maksutov-Cassegrain, dobsonian mount (Orion Apex) Weight ~ 1kg (a couple of pounds) Setup time ~0 East of Transport 1 Longer focal length means smaller field of view for comparable eye pieces. I was impressed with this scope on the planets. It vastly outperforms the Firstscope on optics. The scope comes off the dobsonian mount on a quick release and can be mounted as a spotter scope (the main reason I got it). The dobsonian mount here (one arm) is exactly the same as the mount for the Firstscope. These are sort of the poor mans refractor. Great views of Moon and all the bright planets. Picked out Titan (brightest moon of saturn) with ease. I got this telescope for two reasons, firstly for outreach, in that you can just grab it and point it in seconds, zero setup time. Secondly I can mount it piggyback on the CPC11 (see below) and use it as a spotting/ guide scope. The Maksutov has the 'nice' feature that its a closed tube(helps keep dust out). The Mak. will have the edge on planets/ guidescope etc due to its longer focal length, but the Newtonian will be more all around bang for the buck. Price $600 10in Newtonian reflector, dobsonian mount (Celestron Starhopper) Weight ~ 15kg (~30lbs) Setup time ~10 mins to carry parts outside, 10 mins + cool down. East of Transport: Telescope is about the size of a small child (although not that heavy). It is big and awkward. Difficult to handle for the small. Almost the biggest telescope you can fit in a compact car (the reason I got it). The long open optical train requires periodic alignment (columniation) if it is frequently transported. Powerful deep-sky scope. Near zero photographic potential, but fantastic views of nebula, globular clusters and galaxies. Great scope for planets too. At this size the moon is getting too bright to look at for any length of time. Like most big newtonians, short focal ratio, which pragmatically means you get quite wide angle views. Again well suited to deep sky observing. Price $1500 90mm (3.5in) Stellarvue apochromat, -no mount, tube only (Apo Triplet) Weight ~ 4kg (~8lbs) East of Transport: The telescope is small and easy to transport. Comes with a bag that will go on an airplane as hand baggage. Worth the price for the aperture? Probably not unless you are in a fairly specific niche. This makes a great wide angle lenses for guided photography. As a guidescope its focal length is kind of short. That basically means the field of view for a given eye piece is wide. You need a very short focal length eye piece to get good magnification. I found myself using a 4mm eyepiece to look at planets, and even at that the image was small. As a finder scope though, that wide field is great. The other thing that these scope gives is absolutely beautiful stellar images. The stars just fall into incredible pin pricks. Beautiful contrasty flat views. I found the use of the short focal length eyepieces annoying for planetary use. Lacks the light gathering for versatility as a deep sky instrument. I only really ever used this as a piggybacker for the CPC11 below. Price $2800 11in Schmidt Cassegrain, driven goto alt-az fork mount (CPC11) Weight ~ 30kg (~65lbs) and thats just the top section. Tripods another 15 kg I think. Setup time ~30 mins to carry parts outside and align, 20 mins + cool down. East of Transport: It will fit in a compact car. To carry the telescope any distance really isnt an option unless you are strong. The ergonomic design is very good though. I always found mounting up the scope a bit of a bitch. Aligning it is relatively easy as the scope mount has a GPS in it that means you dont have to plug in these numbers and the time. Alignment is quite easy. I found the scope slips relatively easily unless the clutches are done up very tight. The scope can carry quite a burden (although of course when the scope weights this much extra, it does need to be well balanced). At this level it is an excellent photographic platform. It yields amazing views of almost everything. It's photographic potential is probably as good as you can get from a portable platform. This is the instrument I used to do the full rotation of Jupiter, although there the primary limitation was the stability of the sky.

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1943 days ago by Ordonomundi

Views: 1172 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
11:33
11:33
11:33

Inside the Isaac Newton Telescope - Deep Sky Videos

Behind the scenes at the Isaac Newton Telescope, on La Palma, Canary Islands. Filmed and narrated by Brady Haran. With thanks to Rafael Barrena who was operating the telescope. Extra comments from Professor Mike Merrifeld, University of Nottingham. Our thanks to the Isaac Newton Group of telescopes for hosting us at La Palma and supplying many of the images. http://www.ing.iac.es/ (Special thanks to Javier Mendez at the ING) Extra images supplied by Caren Park (www.parkgallery.org), Iain Macaulay and David Brander from URN Science Show. Deep Sky Videos website: http://www.deepskyvideos.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DeepSkyVideos Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DeepSkyVideos Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/68847473@N02/ More about the astronomers in our videos: http://www.deepskyvideos.com/pages/contributors.html Videos by Brady Haran

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1943 days ago by Ordonomundi

Views: 849 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
02:41
02:41
02:41

Meade LX200 Telescope - What can you see...

Telescope - Meade LX200 - what can you see with a 10" from Eastchurch on the Isle of Sheppey. Kent. UK. Also see "LX200 - Observatory" for more detail of how it works... All images by Peter Bruce Eastchurch Gap. This video sounded better with original Enya music but had to change due to copyright - shame. Images taken with Webcam, Cannon EOS, Starlight Xpress MX7C, Meade DSI 1 & DSI 3 & Astrovid camera's. I wish we could all "see" with our own eyes the pictures shown here but our eyes are not very sensitive at low light levels but what is importance is the fact you can see the sights with a modest set-up. And the night sky is God given and free to view - Best TV in the world...

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1943 days ago by Ordonomundi

Views: 645 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
06:46
06:46
06:46

Hubble Space Telescope - Better Than Ever!

Science & Reason on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/ScienceReason The Hubble Space Telescope Is Back - Better Than Ever! Final Servicing Mission. --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.YouTube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.YouTube.com/ScienceMagazine • http://www.YouTube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.YouTube.com/FFreeThinker --- "Improved Hubble Shows Evidence of Dark Matter" • http://www.youtube.com/user/tdarnell#play/uploads/2/3wluv08tDhU • http://www.deepastronomy.com/ "When Hubble Opened its New Eyes" • http://www.youtube.com/AndromedasWake • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bytNgT7l8k "The Hubble Space Telescope - Rebirth of an Icon (Hubblecast 30)" • http://www.youtube.com/ESOcast • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hjy7YSIH-GI --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a space telescope that was carried into orbit by the space shuttle in April 1990. It is named after the American astronomer Edwin Hubble. Although not the first space telescope, the Hubble is one of the largest and most versatile, and is well-known as both a vital research tool and a public relations boon for astronomy. The HST is a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency, and is one of NASA's Great Observatories, along with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Space telescopes were proposed as early as 1923. The Hubble was funded in the 1970s, with a proposed launch in 1983, but the project was beset by technical delays, budget problems, and the Challenger disaster. When finally launched in 1990, scientists found that the main mirror had been ground incorrectly, severely compromising the telescope's capabilities. However, after a servicing mission in 1993, the telescope was restored to its intended quality. Hubble's orbit outside the distortion of Earth's atmosphere allows it to take extremely sharp images with almost no background light. Hubble's Ultra Deep Field image, for instance, is the most detailed visible-light image ever made of the universe's most distant objects. Many Hubble observations have led to breakthroughs in astrophysics, such as accurately determining the rate of expansion of the universe. The Hubble is the only telescope ever designed to be serviced in space by astronauts. There have been five servicing missions, the last occurring in May 2009. Servicing Mission 1 took place in December 1993 when Hubble's imaging flaw was corrected. Servicing missions 2, 3A, and 3B repaired various sub-systems and replaced many of the observing instruments with more modern and capable versions. However, following the 2003 Space Shuttle Columbia accident, the fifth servicing mission was canceled on safety grounds. After spirited public discussion, NASA reconsidered this decision, and administrator Mike Griffin approved one final Hubble servicing mission. STS-125 was launched in May 2009, and installed two new instruments and made numerous repairs. The latest servicing should allow the telescope to function until at least 2014, when its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), is due to be launched. The JWST will be far superior to Hubble for many astronomical research programs, but will only observe in infrared, so it will complement (not replace) Hubble's ability to observe in the visible and ultraviolet parts of the spectrum. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Space_Telescope .

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1943 days ago by Ordonomundi

Views: 1181 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
09:58
09:58
09:58

Hubble telescope images/ Pink Floyd - Echoes

Slideshow of Hubble telescope images Music: Pink Floyd - Echoes part one, Live at Pompeii

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 1943 days ago by Ordonomundi

Views: 663 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
02:26
02:26
02:26

Stellar Nights Trailer: Constellations, Astrology, Astronomy, and more . . .

A new on-line story telling program is coming soon in 2012. Topics to be covered include the constellations, zodiac, astrology, astronomy, space probes, history and the latest discoveries about the universe. Hosted by Hoku Kane, your ambassador to the stars. Sponsored by Stars Above Hawaii and the Stellar Express Moonlight Cafe.

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1999 days ago by deek

Views: 675 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
04:46
04:46
04:46

Instant Replay of Stellar Eruption

Astronomers are watching the astronomical equivalent of an instant replay of a spectacular outburst from the unstable, behemoth double-star system Eta Carinae, which was initially seen on Earth nearly 170 years ago. Astrophysicists affiliated with UC Santa Barbara and Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) contributed to the study. Read more at Futurity:

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1999 days ago by deek

Views: 564 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
02:50
02:50
02:50

Seeing the Future in the Stars - HubbleSite.org

Astronomers use Hubble images of the giant star cluster Omega Centauri to predict where the stars will be in a decade or more. The cluster's 10 million stars, among the first stars to form in the universe, are in constant motion. Studying their movements helps scientists to understand the formation of the universe. This video is from HubbleSite, the online home of the Hubble Space Telescope. Learn more about this topic. See the news release. http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2010/28/ See images of star cluster Omega Centauri. http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2010/28/image/ http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2001/33/image/a/ Get Omega Centauri wallpaper. http://hubblesite.org/gallery/wallpaper/pr2009025q/ Print an Omega Centauri picture. http://hubblesite.org/gallery/printshop/ps48/

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1999 days ago by deek

Views: 724 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
26:02
26:02
26:02

Helmut Jerjen: Tales of stars and stellar systems - part one

In the first of this two-part video Dr Helmut Jerjen tells 'Tales of stars and stellar systems' . The event is part of Mount Stromlo's Centenary Celebrations. Astronomy has arguably had the single largest impact on the development of science, human society and culture over the past 10,000 years. On our journey through space and time we will explore the glorious life of our sun, learn how astrophysical knowledge acquired 100 years ago can help to solve the energy crisis on Earth today, and find out why we should rightfully call ourselves the children of the stars. The discovery of exoplanets is a regular topic in the international news. Dr Jerjen explains how astronomers measure the faint signal from these distant island worlds, show where our place in the Milky Way is, and disclose how the Universe grew a million times bigger on the night of October 6, 1923. Dr Jerjen is a member of academic staff at the Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics (RSAA) at ANU. As a genuine multi-wavelength astrophysicist he has published over 100 articles in international journals covering topics in the areas of near-field cosmology, stellar populations, galaxy evolution and dark matter. He is the head of the Stromlo Milky Way Satellite Survey team that will make use of the new ANU SkyMapper Telescope to study dark-matter dominated dwarf galaxies in the halo of our Milky Way. Dr Jerjen is passionate about educating future generations of astrophysicists.

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1999 days ago by deek

Views: 649 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
08:18
08:18
08:18

Scale of Distance to Closest Stars

Scale of Distance to Closest Stars

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 1999 days ago by deek

Views: 595 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
14:47
14:47
14:47

Wandering Stars: a tour of the planets

A beauteous rip through the solar sytem, based on NASA's Science on a Sphere program "The Wanderers." In ancient times, humans watched the skies looking for clues to their future and to aid in their very survival. They soon observed that some stars were not fixed, but moved in the sky from night to night. They called these stars the wanderers. At the center of our solar system is the sun, binding the planets with its gravitational pull. From our viewpoint on earth, the sun appears small in the sky, but in reality it dwarfs even Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system. The distance from the sun to the small worlds traveling it are vast. Light takes eight minutes to reach earth, and nearly a day to reach the farthest known bodies. Join us now as we tour our solar system, starting with sun-baked mercury and traveling to the remotest outskirts, where small, icy bodies move with only the faintest connection to our sun. Mercury Mercury, the closest planet to Sun is also the smallest terrestrial planet. It orbits so swiftly that its year lasts only 88 Earth days. The airless cratered surface could almost be mistaken for our moon, relentlessly bombarded by meteoroids for four and a half billion years. One of these encounters left a giant scar called the golarus basin, one of the largest impact sights in the solar system. Temperatures on the surface of mercury can reach a blistering 800 degrees Fahrenheit, and can dip to 300 degrees below zero on the night side. Venus Venus, as seen from Earth, is the brightest object in sky after the Sun and Moon. Russian probes were the first to land on Venus in the 1970's and 1980's. Venus's surface is volcanic. Its atmosphere is composed of thick, dense carbon dioxide with sulfuric acid clouds. Both are potent greenhouse gases that trap incoming sunlight. Venus rotates slowly—one Venusian day lasts almost four Earth months. Earth Earth is the only planet with life as we know it. The atmosphere and temperatures are "just right" for life. It is the only known body in our solar system where water can exist as a gas, liquid, and solid. Vast oceans dominate surface of the planet. Seasonal changes occur on the surface. Earth has a solid surface that constantly shifts due to plate tectonics. Mars Once geologically active, Mars has the largest dormant volcano in the solar system, Olympus Mons. It also hast the longest valley in the solar system, called Valles Marineris. Mars has a thin, atmosphere primarily composed of carbon dioxide. Surface conditions are dynamic. Mars has seasons as well as massive dust storms that cover the planet. Its surface features include the smooth, low-lying northern hemisphere and the craggy, heavily-cratered southern uplands. Evidence suggests that Mars had water running on its surface at some time in the past. Asteroid belt The asteroid belt is composed of small rocky pieces. The big question is "What happened here?" and "Why no planets?" The asteroid Ceres is large enough to be classified as a dwarf planet. Jupiter Jupiter is the largest and most massive planet in the Solar System. It rotates rapidly, completing one rotation every 10 hours. Long-lasting, high-speed winds and storms dominate Jupiter's atmosphere. Jupiter has a faint planetary ring system and over 63 moons. The largest moons, discovered by Galileo in 1610, vary widely. Io is volcanically active. Europa's cracked surface likely hides an ocean below. Ganymede is the largest moon in the Solar System. Callisto is heavily cratered. Saturn Saturn's seemingly serene atmosphere hides powerful storms and winds on its surface. Saturn is known for its extensive ring system made of chunks of ice, rock, and dust with small moonlets embedded within the rings. Saturn has more than 60 moons. Conditions vary among the moons. Titan, the largest moon, has a thick, smoggy, atmosphere covering its icy surface with lakes of liquid methane or ethane. Small Enceladus has water and ice geysers at its south pole. Its water vapor coat other nearby moons and create a thin Saturn ring. Uranus Uranus receives 400 times less sunlight than Earth. Uranus lies nearly sideways, making its axis nearly parallel to the plane of the Solar System. This extreme tilt give rise to seasons that last nearly 28 Earth years. Uranus as many moons and a faint ring system. It has only been visited by one spacecraft, Voyager 2, in 1986. Like the other giant planets, Uranus's atmosphere is primarily hydrogen and helium with a trace of methane gas over deep clouds, giving it a pale blue-green tint. Neptune Neptune also has many moons and a faint ring system. Its Great Dark Spot, a large storm with extremely strong winds, disappeared in the 1990s. Neptune's vivid blue color is due to its frigid temperature: -371°F (-224 °C).

Channels: Planetary science 

Added: 1999 days ago by deek

Views: 763 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
01:39
01:39
01:39

PREVIEW: Alien Planets & Eyeball Earths

Music by Zero Project. The hunt for planets beyond our solar system has reached a fever pitch. With some 500 planets revealed by ground telescopes, now, the ultimate planet finder, the Kepler space telescope, has released a tsunami of data. Among over a thousand new planet prospects are 200 multi-planet solar systems and 58 worlds in life-friendly orbits. They're all within a narrow window on the sky the size of your hand. That's why this may be the tip of the iceberg in a galaxy that's literally crawling with planets. Scientists are now beginning to envision what these worlds are like, with atmospheres, oceans, geological history. In the process, they are redefining what a planet might need to spawn life.

Channels: Planetary science 

Added: 1999 days ago by deek

Views: 712 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
01:30
01:30
01:30

NASA's Kepler Discovery Confirms First Planet Orbiting Two Stars

September 15, 2011 (CERESTV.com) PASADENA, Calif. -- The existence of a world with a double sunset, as portrayed in the film Star Wars more than 30 years ago, is now scientific fact. NASA's Kepler mission has made the first unambiguous detection of a circumbinary planet -- a planet orbiting two stars -- 200 light-years from Earth. Unlike Star Wars' Tatooine, the planet is cold, gaseous and not thought to harbor life, but its discovery demonstrates the diversity of planets in our galaxy. Previous research has hinted at the existence of circumbinary planets, but clear confirmation proved elusive. Kepler detected such a planet, known as Kepler-16b, by observing transits, where the brightness of a parent star dims from the planet crossing in front of it. "This discovery confirms a new class of planetary systems that could harbor life," Kepler Principal Investigator William Borucki, of NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., said. "Given that most stars in our galaxy are part of a binary system, this means the opportunities for life are much broader than if planets form only around single stars. This milestone discovery confirms a theory that scientists have had for decades but could not prove until now." A research team led by Laurance Doyle of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif., used data from the Kepler space telescope, which measures dips in the brightness of more than 150,000 stars, to search for transiting planets. Kepler is the first NASA mission capable of finding Earth-size planets in or near the "habitable zone," the region in a planetary system where liquid water can exist on the surface of the orbiting planet. Scientists detected the new planet in the Kepler-16 system, a pair of orbiting stars that eclipse each other from our vantage point on Earth. When the smaller star partially blocks the larger star, a primary eclipse occurs, and a secondary eclipse occurs when the smaller star is occulted, or completely blocked, by the larger star. Astronomers further observed that the brightness of the system dipped even when the stars were not eclipsing one another, hinting at a third body. The additional dimming in brightness events, called the tertiary and quaternary eclipses, reappeared at irregular intervals of time, indicating the stars were in different positions in their orbit each time the third body passed. This showed the third body was circling, not just one, but both stars, in a wide circumbinary orbit. The gravitational tug on the stars, measured by changes in their eclipse times, was a good indicator of the mass of the third body. Only a very slight gravitational pull was detected, one that only could be caused by a small mass. The findings are described in a new study published Friday, Sept. 16, in the journal Science. "Most of what we know about the sizes of stars comes from such eclipsing binary systems, and most of what we know about the size of planets comes from transits," said Doyle, who also is the lead author and a Kepler participating scientist. "Kepler-16 combines the best of both worlds, with stellar eclipses and planetary transits in one system." This discovery confirms that Kepler-16b is an inhospitable, cold world about the size of Saturn and thought to be made up of about half rock and half gas. The parent stars are smaller than our sun. One is 69 percent the mass of the sun and the other only 20 percent. Kepler-16b orbits around both stars every 229 days, similar to Venus' 225-day orbit, but lies outside the system's habitable zone, where liquid water could exist on the surface, because the stars are cooler than our sun. "Working in film, we often are tasked with creating something never before seen," said visual effects supervisor John Knoll of Industrial Light & Magic, a division of Lucasfilm Ltd., in San Francisco. "However, more often than not, scientific discoveries prove to be more spectacular than anything we dare imagine. There is no doubt these discoveries influence and inspire storytellers. Their very existence serves as cause to dream bigger and open our minds to new possibilities beyond what we think we 'know.'" For more information about the Kepler mission and to view the digital press kit, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/kepler

Channels: Planetary science 

Added: 1999 days ago by deek

Views: 588 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
11:11
11:11
11:11

Exoplanet Transit - Deep Sky Videos

We're watching the star Wasp-33 as a giant, fast-moving planet moves across its stellar disc. The extrasolar transit is being recorded by Liam Hardy using a telescope called the pt5m. Deep Sky Videos website: http://www.deepskyvideos.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DeepSkyVideos Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DeepSkyVideos Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/68847473@N02/ More about the astronomers in our videos: http://www.deepskyvideos.com/pages/contributors.html Videos by Brady Haran Thanks to Paul Haese for his Mercury transit image: http://paulhaese.net/

Channels: Planetary science 

Added: 2035 days ago by deek

Views: 580 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
05:09
05:09
05:09

ESO 20 Richest eXoPlanetary System Ever [HD] Discovered by HARPS (not HAARP!)

~credits video: http://youtube.com/ESOobservatory Astronomers using ESO instruments have discovered a remarkable extrasolar planetary system that has some striking similarities to our own Solar System. At least five planets are orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180, and the regular pattern of their orbits is similar to that observed for our neighbouring planets. One of the new extrasolar worlds could be only 1.4 times the mass of the Earth, making it the least massive exoplanet ever found. This video podcast explains how these faraway planets were detected and exactly what we know about them. Astronomers using ESO's world-leading HARPS instrument have discovered a planetary system containing at least five planets, orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180. The researchers also believe the system has two other planets, one of which would have the lowest mass ever found, making the system similar to our own Solar System in terms of the number of planets. Furthermore, the scientists find that the location of the planets follows a regular pattern, as also seen in our own Solar System The team of astronomers used the HARPS spectrograph, attached to ESO's 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla, Chile. HARPS is an instrument with unrivalled stability and great precision, and the world's most successful exoplanet hunter. The astronomers, led by Christophe Lovis from the Geneva Observatory, studied the Sun-like star HD 10180 over a period of six years! This star is located 127 light-years away in the southern constellation Hydrus ("the Male Water Snake"). Thanks to the 190 individual HARPS measurements, the astronomers detected the wobbles of the star caused by five or more planets. The five strongest signals correspond to planets with Neptune-like masses — between 13 and 25 Earth masses — which orbit the star in between 6 to 600 days. The astronomers have also strong reason to believe that two other planets are present. One would be a Saturn-like planet orbiting in 2200 days. The other, having a mass of only about 1.4 times that of the Earth would be the least massive exoplanet ever discovered. This suspected planet is very close to its host star and so it is likely to be very hot. One 'year' on this planet lasts only 1.18 Earth-days! The newly discovered Solar System is unique in several respects. First of all, with at least five Neptune-like planets lying within a distance equivalent to the orbit of Mars, this system is more populated than our own Solar System in its inner region, and has many more massive planets there. Furthermore, the system probably has no Jupiter-like gas giant. In addition, all the planets seem to have almost circular orbits. Dynamical studies of the new system reveal complex interactions between planets and give us insights into its long-term evolution. Using the new discovery as well as data for other planetary systems, the astronomers discovered that the locations of the planets seem to follow a regular pattern — similar to the "Titius-Bode" law that exists in our Solar System. This could be a general signature of how planetary systems form. Another important result is that all very massive planetary systems are found around massive and metal-rich stars, while the four lowest-mass systems are found around lower-mass and metal-poor stars. These properties confirm current theoretical models. There is no doubt that this remarkable discovery highlights the fact that we are now entering a new era in exoplanet science: the study of complex planetary systems and not just of individual planets!! And with HARPS, European astronomers will be a driving force behind this transition. --- ESOcast is produced by ESO, the European Southern Observatory. ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the pre-eminent intergovernmental science and technology organisation in astronomy designing, constructing and operating the world's most advanced ground-based telescopes. • http://eso.org

Channels: Planetary science 

Added: 2035 days ago by deek

Views: 1300 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
04:25
04:25
04:25

ESOcast 35: Fifty New Exoplanets

Astronomers using ESO's leading exoplanet hunter HARPS have today announced more than fifty newly discovered planets around other stars. Among these are many rocky planets not much heavier than the Earth. One of them in particular seems to orbit in the habitable zone around its star. This ESOcast we look at how astronomers discover these distant worlds and what the future may hold for finding rocky worlds like the Earth that may support life. Credits and download options are available on: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1134a/

Channels: Planetary science 

Added: 2035 days ago by deek

Views: 654 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
05:02
05:02
05:02

Hubble Space Telescope Directly Observes Exoplanet

Science & Reason on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/ScienceReason Hubblecast 22: Hubble Space Telescope Directly Observes Exoplanet Orbiting Fomalhaut. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has discovered an extrasolar planet, for the first time using direct visible-light imaging. The strange world is far-flung from its parent star, is surrounded by a colossal belt of gas and dust, and may even have rings more impressive than Saturn's. --- Subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.YouTube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.YouTube.com/ScienceMagazine • http://www.YouTube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.YouTube.com/FFreeThinker --- Credit: - ESA/Hubble (M. Kornmesser & L. L. Christensen) - Visual design & Editing: Martin Kornmesser - Animations: Martin Kornmesser & Luis Calçada - Web Hosting: Leibniz-Rechenzentrum (LRZ) - Web Technical Support: Lars Holm Nielsen & Raquel Yumi Shida - Written by: Lee Pullen & Lars Lindberg Christensen - Host: Dr. J - Narration: Bob Fosbury - Cinematography: Peter Rixner - Music: movetwo - Footage and photos: A. Fujii, Digitized Sky Survey 2, NASA, ESA, and P. Kalas (University of California, Berkeley). Acknowledgment: Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble) - Directed by: Lars Lindberg Christensen Dr. J is a German astronomer at the ESO. His scientific interests are in cosmology, particularly on galaxy evolution and quasars. Dr. J's real name is Joe Liske and he has a PhD in astronomy. Hubble European Space Agency Information Centre Garching/Munich, Germany • http://www.eso.org • http://www.spacetelescope.org • http://hubblesite.org .

Channels: Planetary science 

Added: 2035 days ago by deek

Views: 1381 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
01:01:56
01:01:56
01:01:56

Plasma Physics' Answers to the New Cosmological Questions by Dr. Donald E. Scott - Full Video

NASA Goddard presentation by Dr. Donald E. Scott on plasma cosmology (electric cosmology) Watch an exciting layman's tutorial on plasma cosmology here: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4773590301316220374# Learn more about plasma cosmology here: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/00current.htm A massive list of reasons why Einstein was wrong and plasma physicists are right: http://knol.google.com/k/einstein-was-wrong-falsifying-observational-evidence-presented#

Channels: Major questions in astronomy 

Added: 2041 days ago by deek

Views: 725 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:00
00:00
00:00

Thunderbolts of the Gods

In science one of the best markers for the accuracy of a model or theory is how well it predicts outcomes. This applies not only to future events but can also be applied to existing data. Below is a collection of predictions based on Electric Universe principles, which have been confirmed by observations and data. The link above provides a list of pending predictions.

Channels: Solar astronomy  Stellar astronomy  Galactic astronomy  Extragalactic astronomy  Cosmology 

Added: 2799 days ago by starnamer

Views: 1047 | Comments: 1

star star star star star 

 
09:09
09:09
09:09

1998 PBS A Science Odyssey 2 - Mysteries of the Universe 6 of 11

Things that have made us wonder. playlist link http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=04CFF1488DFC69E5

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 2881 days ago by deek

Views: 2238 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
09:00
09:00
09:00

3of5_Cosmic Odyssey-Hubble Heritage

This is part 3 of a 5 part episode. To watch the full show go to my channel (Zuke696) then go to my Playlist, find the show then click Play All - Hubble's Heritage - In 1929, astronomer Edwin Hubble made one of the greatest discoveries in the history of science -- the expansion of the universe. To honor this king of cosmology, an orbiting observatory named the Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990 after years of research and delay. Hubble's Heritage takes a closer look at this instrument, from its beginning as a flawed engineering nightmare to its evolution, through corrective optics, into humanity's eyes on the universe. Viewers see some of the astonishing images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope through the years and learn of their significance to astronomers. Designers of the next generation of space telescopes explain the challenges that must be met before Hubble's successors can reveal more mysteries of the universe.

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 2881 days ago by deek

Views: 1132 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
09:00
09:00
09:00

4of5_Cosmic Odyssey-Hubble Heritage

This is part 4 of a 5 part episode. To watch the full show go to my channel (Zuke696) then go to my Playlist, find the show then click Play All - Hubble's Heritage - In 1929, astronomer Edwin Hubble made one of the greatest discoveries in the history of science -- the expansion of the universe. To honor this king of cosmology, an orbiting observatory named the Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990 after years of research and delay. Hubble's Heritage takes a closer look at this instrument, from its beginning as a flawed engineering nightmare to its evolution, through corrective optics, into humanity's eyes on the universe. Viewers see some of the astonishing images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope through the years and learn of their significance to astronomers. Designers of the next generation of space telescopes explain the challenges that must be met before Hubble's successors can reveal more mysteries of the universe.

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 2881 days ago by deek

Views: 737 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
09:50
09:50
09:50

Cosmic Voyage (2 of 4)

A journey to the edge of the universe and into the microcosmos. Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science. -- Edwin P. Hubble

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 2881 days ago by deek

Views: 1056 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
09:57
09:57
09:57

Cosmic Voyage (3 of 4)

A journey to the edge of the universe and into the microcosmos. Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science. -- Edwin P. Hubble

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 2881 days ago by deek

Views: 931 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
06:35
06:35
06:35

Cosmic Voyage (4 of 4)

A journey to the edge of the universe and into the microcosmos. Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science. -- Edwin P. Hubble

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 2881 days ago by deek

Views: 988 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated