Deprecated: mysql_connect(): The mysql extension is deprecated and will be removed in the future: use mysqli or PDO instead in /home/theastro/public_html/include/vshare.php on line 7
The Astronomersdynamics
Videos with tag dynamics
Results 1-25 of 40
 
01:07
01:07
01:07
 
02:02
02:02
02:02

SDO: Solar Tornadoes (2012.02.07) [1080p]

Time-lapse animation showing enormous tornado-like vortices on the Sun's limb as seen by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory between 2012-02-07T08:00:00 and 2012-02-08T23:00:00. Each image in this animation was taken at 36 second intervals. credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio source: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?3919

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1762 days ago by deek

Views: 1690 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
01:07
01:07
01:07

Tornado Season On The Sun?

For a 30 hour spell (Feb 7-8, 2012) the Solar Dynamics Observatory captured plasma caught in a magnetic dance across the Sun's surface. The results closely resemble extreme tornadic activity on Earth. - Original Music by Mark C. Petersen, Loch Ness Productions

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1816 days ago by deek

Views: 542 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
03:43
03:43
03:43

Tornado causes a storm on the Sun

A solar twister many times as wide as the Earth has been filmed in action by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Astronomy Now speaks to the scientists who spotted this amazing phenomenon.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1816 days ago by deek

Views: 475 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
02:14
02:14
02:14

Earth Sized Tornado Spins On Sun's Surface Feb-2012.mpg

Vast solar tornado spins on the sun A tremendous tornado whirling across the surface of the sun was captured by a NASA satellite recently -- an amazing wonder of the solar system that may be as big as the Earth itself. The video was recorded by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), a sun-watching satellite that has transmitted a series of stunning photos of solar flares in recent months. The new video shows darker, cooler plasma shifting back and forth above the sun's surface over the span of nearly 30 hours stretching from Feb. 7 to Feb. 8. And the giant tornado may be as large as the Earth itself, with gusts of up to 300,000 mph, explained Terry Kucera, deputy SOHO project scientist and a solar physicist with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/02/17/vast-solar-tornado-spied-on-sun/#ixzz1mfrMpwlP Source http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/02/17/vast-solar-tornado-spied-on-sun/ Related Video Tornado Season On The Sun? Youtube Channel VideoFromSpace http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-zt8qnTcLM&feature=player_embedded About the utube examiner's channel Video's on this channel are under Fair USE Law.17 U.S.C. § 107 Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. § 106 and 17 U.S.C. § 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news. This is what this channel is for Comments on Video subjects.Your Ideas suggestions and thoughts.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1816 days ago by deek

Views: 1296 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:52
00:52
00:52

Huge 'Tornado' Churns on Sun's Surface - Close-Up Video

A circular storm as wide as five Earths was captured churning on the Sun's surface on Sept. 25, 2011, by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft. Time-lapsed multiple filter views are looped in this video. - Original Music by Mark C. Petersen, Loch Ness Productions

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1816 days ago by deek

Views: 502 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:29
00:29
00:29

NASA SDO - X1.9 Class Solar Flare, November 3, 2011.mov

"Bad Boy" active region 1339 continues to flare. At 20:27 UT a solar flare peaked at X1.9. X-class flares are pretty massive and are major events that can trigger planet-wide radio blackouts and long-lasting radiation storms. The location of this sunspot/active region is still not quiet Earth directed. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 448 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
04:49
04:49
04:49

NASA SDO - Aurora; What Causes Them?

Aurora are colorful lights in the night time sky primarily appearing in Earth's polar regions. But what causes them? The culprit behind aurora is our own Sun and the solar plasma that is ejected during a magnetic event like a flare or a coronal mass ejection. This plasma travels outward along with the solar wind and when it encounters Earth's magnetic field, it travels down the field lines that connect at the poles. Atoms in the plasma interacts with atoms in Earth's upper atmosphere.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 1074 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:28
00:28
00:28

NASA SDO - X2-class Solar Flare, January 27, 2012

Our "bad boy" sunspot 1402 continues to unleash flares. At 18:37 UT this active region produced the largest category of flares; an X-class flare. It measured X2 to be exact. Since this active region is rotating over the limb of the Sun the eruption was not Earth directed. But energetic protons accelerated by the blast are now surrounding our planet and a S1-class radiation storm is in progress. S1-class is the lowest of 5 (S1 to S5) and has no biological impact, no satellite operations are impacted but some minor impact on HF radio is experienced. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 335 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:23
00:23
00:23

NASA SDO - Planet-sized Bubbles

An intense solar flare observation by yours truly on October 22, 2011. Especially watch the dark "blobs" falling downward into the flare from above. These are not dense blobs of cool matter - they're actually voids in plasma! Planet-sized bubbles of low density, moving through the 15 million-degree plasma. This warms the cockles of my heart. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 519 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:20
00:20
00:20

NASA SDO - Lunar Transit, February 21, 2012

Today we were treated to a very special sight; the Moon came in between the SDO satellite and the Sun. For 1 hour and 41 minutes team SDO observed the Lunar Transit. This event only happens a few times a year but gives the SDO Team an opportunity to better understand the AIA instrument on SDO and give it a fine tune. This video shows today's Lunar Eclipse in a variety of wavelengths the AIA instrument observes. Each wavelength shows us a different temperature and layer of the Sun, allowing us to study the Sun and its activities. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 389 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:34
00:34
00:34

NASA SDO - M8.7-class Solar Flare, Jan 23, 2012

The Chinese New Year certainly started with a bang this morning. At approx. 04:00 UT a strong and long duration M8.7-class solar flare exploded from Active Region 1402. NASA SDO captured this event and thanks to ESA/NASA SOHO and NASA STEREO Behind spacecrafts, we have also learned of a very quick moving Coronal Mass Ejection. The CME is traveling at approx. 2,200 km per second and the Goddard Space Weather Lab predicts the arrival of this CME on earth to be January 24, 2012 at approx. 14:18 UT (+/- 7 hours). It also shows that Mars will get hit too, several hours after Earth. These kinds of events can cause problems for spacecrafts in geosynchronous, polar and other orbits passing could be affected by the cloud's arrival. In addition, strong geomagnetic storms are possible, so high-latitude sky watchers should be alert for Aurorae. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 401 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
01:30
01:30
01:30

NASA SDO - Large Sunspot AR1339, November 1 - 8, 2011

The black and white images show the magnetic field - the field is pointing toward us where it is white. The leading spots all have an intense negative polarity and the following spots are mostly positive. The two polarities are pretty well separated and fairly stable, which is why this region hasn't produced even more dramatic activity. The biggest explosions happen when complex magnetic regions annihilate each other. The glittering moving features around the spots follow the crests of magnetic waves. Not much new flux is emerging into this mature region, but there is a lot going on in the vicinity - and just about everywhere else too if you look carefully. The surrounding filamentary structures are weaker field regions that appear bright in intensity. The movie with the granular yellow background shows the Sun's surface brightness. Sunspot group 11339 is already large when it rotates around to the front side of the Sun. The umbra is the darker, cooler part where the magnetic field is very strong and vertical. The surrounding orange penumbra appears very dynamic because waves in the weaker horizontal magnetic field make it look like material is flowing out of the spot. Watch how the darkest regions develop in time. The largest spot is more than five times the size of our Earth. What you cannot tell from these pictures is which direction the magnetic field is pointing. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 397 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:25
00:25
00:25

NASA SDO - Growing Sunspot

The video from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard SDO shows the Active Region 1393 from January 6 through January 8 and demonstrates how sunspots can quickly change shape and size. Sunspots are planet-sized magnets created by the Sun's inner magnetic dynamo. Like all magnets in the Universe, sunspots have north (N) and south (S) magnetic poles Sunspots, temporary disturbances in the Sun's photosphere, are the most visible advertisement of the solar magnetic field. They appear dark because temperatures are considerably lower than in surrounding areas. Sunspots occur where the magnetic field lines emerge from the inside of the Sun to form expanding loops above its surface. Sunspots usually show up as small forms that are irregularly shaped, and grow within days or weeks to their full size. While they can last weeks or months, they do eventually disappear, often by breaking into smaller and smaller sunspots. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 433 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:29
00:29
00:29

NASA SDO - X1.1 Solar Flare, March 5, 2012

After several days of a quiet Sun, the solar activity is now high again. Big sunspot AR1429, which emerged on March 2nd, is crackling with strong flares. This morning brought the strongest so far--an X1-class eruption on March 5th at 0413 UT. This flare propelled a bright Coronal Mass Ejection into Space, which will probably miss Earth, but hit Mercury and Venus. Even if this CME misses, high-latitude sky watchers should still be alert for auroras in the nights ahead. An M2-class eruption from the same sunspot on March 4th produced another, wider CME that might yet intersect Earth. The cloud is expected to deliver a glancing blow to our planet's magnetic field on March 6th at 04:30 UT (+/- 7 hr). Take a look at the forecast from our friends at the NASA Goddard Space Weather Lab: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/downloads/20120305_085600_anim.tim-den.gif Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 408 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:13
00:13
00:13

NASA SDO - First Visual of Comet Lovejoy

The Comet Lovejoy seen through the Solar Dynamics Observatory AIA telescope in the 171 angstrom wavelength. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 483 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:16
00:16
00:16

NASA SDO - January 2, 2012 Eruption

An active region just passed the Western limb of the Sun produced a very nice eruption today. Lots of solar material was ejected into Space but it was not Earth directed. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 458 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
01:05
01:05
01:05

NASA SDO - Traveling Sunspots (Feb 7 - 20, 2011)

A beautiful video showing a full side to side passing of an active region and the movement of sunspots as seen by the HMI instrument. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager extends the capabilities of the SOHO/MDI instrument with continual full-disk coverage at higher spatial resolution and new vector magnetogram capabilities. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 590 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:26
00:26
00:26

NASA SDO - Big Sunspot, Big Effects

This is the sunspot region AR 1429 that generated several major solar storms recently. The video covers nine days (March 4 - 12, 2012). Notice how the spot is almost always changing as its magnetic fields realign themselves. The images are white light images called intensity grams. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 487 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:41
00:41
00:41

NASA SDO - Twist & Eclipse

Over the past 24 hours we have seen some beautiful solar events. None of them have a direct impact on Earth, but they are astonishing to watch. It just shows how an active Star our Sun really is. Far from boring. On December 8, 2011 a twisting prominence eruption occurred on the lower eastern limb. The view through the AIA 304 angstrom filter shows us this beautiful eruption. In the early hours of December 9, 2011 SDO observed a little bit of a different eclipse. An erupting cloud of plasma was eclipsed by a dark magnetic filament. The eruption is still on the far side of the Sun, behind the eastern limb and is slowly moving forward and over the limb sometime next week. In front you can observe the filament of relatively cool dark material floating across the Sun's surface in the foreground. That filament partially blocks the view of the hot plasma eruption behind it. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 505 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:25
00:25
00:25

NASA SDO - Today's Un-Boring Sun; December 7, 2011

December 7, 2011; Today's Sun in various wavelengths showing various temperatures and layers of the Sun. Not only that, but we also added the Sun's magnetic field lines to the view. These images were taken at approx. the same time We start off looking at the 6,000 degrees C. Photosphere. See the various sunspots on the "surface" of the Sun? Now let's transition into the region between the Chromosphere and the Corona, at about 1 million degrees C. From there we go into a composite of three different wavelengths showing temperatures up to 2 million degrees C. And at the end we add the complex field of Magnetic Field lines to the various active regions. And who says the Sun is boring? Credit: NASA SDO Thanks to Steele Hill

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 438 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:28
00:28
00:28

NASA SDO - Filament Snap, November 14, 2011

And within just a few hours the very massive filament (see post from earlier today) is approx. 1/3 shorter. This movie shows the developments from 13:00 to 16:00 UT on November 14, 2011. A solar prominence (also known as a filament when viewed against the solar disk) is a large, bright feature extending outward from the Sun's surface. Prominences are anchored to the Sun's surface in the photosphere, and extend outwards into the Sun's hot outer atmosphere, called the corona. A prominence forms over timescales of about a day, and stable prominences may persist in the corona for several months, looping hundreds of thousands of miles into space. Scientists are still researching how and why prominences are formed. The red-glowing looped material is plasma, a hot gas comprised of electrically charged hydrogen and helium. The prominence plasma flows along a tangled and twisted structure of magnetic fields generated by the sun's internal dynamo. An erupting prominence occurs when such a structure becomes unstable and bursts outward, releasing the plasma. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 444 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:08
00:08
00:08

NASA SDO: M8.7 Solar Flare (22 Jan 2012)

Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the flare, shown here in teal as that is the color typically used to show light in the 131 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength in which it is easy to view solar flares. The flare began at 10:38 PM ET on Jan. 22, peaked at 10:59 PM and ended at 11:34 PM.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 466 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:21
00:21
00:21

NASA SDO - Three in Profile

Three energized active regions that were lined up latitudinally (along a North-South line) rotated into profile view at the Sun's edge and put on a good solar show (Oct. 21-23, 2011). They were observed in extreme ultraviolet light. The magnetic forces of the active regions were feverishly connecting and reconnecting the entire time. Towards the end of the clip, the middle region spurted off a burst of plasma and then the upper one erupted with a flare, followed by cascades of bright loops reorganizing themselves above it. SDO's high resolution images and fast cadence of images let us see a level of detail never before possible. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 369 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
00:45
00:45
00:45

NASA SDO - X5.4-class Solar Flare, March 7, 2012

Right at midnight UT time the active region 1429 unleashed a powerful X5.4-class solar flare. X-class flares are the strongest of the flares. They are major events that can trigger planet-wide radio blackouts and long-lasting radiation storms. It appears that right after the large X5.4 flare another slightly lower, X1 flare (5 times smaller) occurred. You can clearly see a wave going across the Sun. We are still gathering data and the Space Weather Forecast Lab will be having updates available soon. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1818 days ago by deek

Views: 444 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated