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The Astronomersobservatory
Videos with tag observatory
Results 1-25 of 51
 
06:57
06:57
06:57

VST - The New VLT Survey Telescope

http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... ESOcast 30: First Images from the VLT Survey Telescope - VST and OmegaCAM start work. This ESOcast introduces the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), the latest addition to ESO's Paranal Observatory. This new telescope has just made its first release of impressive images of the southern sky. The VST is a state-of-the-art 2.6-metre telescope, with the huge 268-megapixel camera OmegaCAM at its heart. It is designed to map the sky both quickly and with very fine image quality. It is a visible-light telescope that perfectly complements ESO's VISTA infrared survey telescope. New images of the Omega Nebula and the globular cluster Omega Centauri demonstrate the VST's power. --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- A new telescope for mapping the skies is about to start work at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile. The VLT Survey Telescope, or VST, with the 268 megapixel OmegaCAM camera at its heart, is the latest addition to the observatory. It is the largest telescope in the world designed to survey the sky in visible light. The special thing about the VST is that it has a very wide field of view — about twice as broad as the full Moon. It's dedicated to mapping the skies both very quickly and with very high image quality. The VST is housed in an enclosure right next to the VLT Unit Telescopes on the summit of Cerro Paranal under the pristine skies of one of the best observing sites on the planet. Over the next few years the VST and its huge camera OmegaCAM will be busy making some very detailed maps of the southern skies and in this episode you'll get to see the very first released images from this brand new telescope. The VST is a visible light telescope that perfectly complements the VISTA infrared survey telescope. The unique combination of the VST and VISTA will allow many interesting objects to be identified that can then be studied in detail with the powerful telescopes of the VLT. The VST is a state-of-the-art 2.6-metre telescope equipped with an active optics system that keeps the two mirrors of the telescope perfectly aligned at all times in order to ensure the highest possible image quality. Now, at its core, behind huge lenses, lies the OmegaCAM camera which was built around no less than 32 CCD detectors which, together, create a whopping 268 megapixel image. The camera also contains some extra CCDs that help with the telescope guiding and the active optics system, as well as some absolutely enormous colour filters. Both the telescope and the camera were designed to take full advantage of the excellent observing conditions on Paranal. The VST will make three public surveys over the next five years. One survey, called KIDS, will image several regions of the sky away from the Milky Way. It will help astronomers understand more about dark matter, dark energy and galaxy evolution, and find many new galaxy clusters and high-redshift quasars. The VST ATLAS survey will cover a larger area of sky and will focus on determining the properties of dark energy. Like KIDS, it will also hunt for far-away galaxies and quasars. The third survey, VPHAS+, will image the central plane of the Milky Way to map the structure of the Galactic disc and its star-formation history. It will yield a catalogue of around 500 million objects and will discover many new examples of unusual stars at all stages of their evolution. The VST has just made its first release of images: The spectacular Omega Nebula, also known as Swan Nebula, is a region of gas, dust and hot young stars that lies in the heart of the Milky Way. The VST field of view is so large that the entire nebula, including its fainter outer parts, is captured — and retains its superb sharpness cross the entire field. Omega Centauri is the largest globular cluster in the sky. But the VST, with its very wide field of view, has no problem in capturing the whole object in a single image, including its very faint outer regions. This image contains about 300 000 stars and it highlights the impressive sharpness of the VST's images. The combination of large field of view, excellent image quality, and the very efficient operations scheme of the VST will produce an enormous wealth of information that will advance a number of different fields of astrophysics. Many astronomers — including myself, actually — are really looking forward to the first results from the VST surveys. Credit: ESO .

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 2003 days ago by Ordonomundi

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07:23
07:23
07:23

A Telescope's Wire To The World

http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... ESOcast 23: A telescope's wire to the world. Stretching 100 kilometres through Chile's harsh Atacama Desert, a newly inaugurated data cable is creating new opportunities at ESO's Paranal Observatory and the Observatorio Cerro Armazones. Connecting these facilities to the main Latin American scientific data backbone completes the last gap in the high-speed link between the observatories and Europe. --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- EVALSO: A New High-speed Data Link to Chilean Observatories This new cable is part of the EVALSO (Enabling Virtual Access to Latin American Southern Observatories) project, a European Commission FP7 co-funded programme co-ordinated by the University of Trieste that includes ESO, Observatorio Cerro Armazones (OCA, part of Ruhr-Universität Bochum), the Chilean academic network REUNA and other organisations. As well as the cable itself, the EVALSO project involves buying capacity on existing infrastructure to complete a high-bandwidth connection from the Paranal area to ESO's headquarters near Munich, Germany. Project co-ordinator Fernando Liello said: "This project has been an excellent collaboration between the consortium members. As well as giving a fast connection to the two observatories, it brings wider benefits to the academic communities both in Europe and Latin America." The sites of Paranal and Armazones are ideal for astronomical observation due to their high altitude, clear skies and remoteness from light pollution. But their location means they are far from any pre-existing communications infrastructure, which until now has left them dependent on a microwave link to send scientific data back to a base station near Antofagasta. Telescopes at ESO's Paranal observatory produce well over 100 gigabytes of data per night, equivalent to more than 20 DVDs, even after compressing the files. While the existing link is sufficient to carry the data from the current generation of instruments at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), it does not have the bandwidth to handle data from the VISTA telescope (Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy, see eso0949), or for the new generation of VLT instruments coming online in the next few years. This means that for much of the data coming from Paranal, the only practical way to send it to ESO Headquarters has been to save it onto hard drives and send these by airmail. This can mean a wait of days or even weeks before observations from VISTA are ready for analysis. Even with this careful rationing of the connection and sophisticated data management to use the connection as efficiently as possible, the link can get saturated at peak times. While this causes no major problems at present, it indicates that the link is reaching capacity. ESO Director General Tim de Zeeuw said: "ESO's observatory at Paranal is growing, with new telescopes and instruments coming online. Our world-class scientific observatories need state-of-the-art infrastructure." In the place of the existing connection, which has a limit of 16 megabit/s (similar to home ADSL broadband), EVALSO will provide a much faster 10 gigabit/s link — a speed fast enough to transfer an entire DVD movie in a matter of seconds. Mario Campolargo, Director, Emerging Technologies and Infrastructures at the European Commission, said: "It is strategically important that the community of astronomers of Europe gets the best access possible to the ESO observatories: this is one of the reasons why the European Union supports the deployment of regional e-infrastructures for science in Latin America and interlinks them with GÉANT and other EU e-infrastructures." The dramatic increase in bandwidth will allow increased use of Paranal's data from a distance, in real-time. It will allow easier monitoring of the VISTA telescope's performance, and quicker access to VLT data, increasing the responsiveness of quality control. And with the expanded bandwidth, new opportunities will open up, such as astronomers and technicians taking part in meetings via high-definition videoconferencing without having to travel to Chile. Moreover, looking forward, the new link will provide enough bandwidth to keep up with the ever-growing volumes of information from Paranal and Armazones in future years, as new and bandwidth-intensive instruments come into use. Immediate remote access to data at a distant location is not just about saving money and making the observatory's work more efficient. For unexpected and unpredictable events, such as gamma-ray bursts, there is often not enough time for astronomers to travel to observatories, and EVALSO will give experts a chance to work remotely on these events almost as if they were at the observatory. • http://www.eso.org .

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 2003 days ago by Ordonomundi

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02:41
02:41
02:41

Meade LX200 Telescope - What can you see...

Telescope - Meade LX200 - what can you see with a 10" from Eastchurch on the Isle of Sheppey. Kent. UK. Also see "LX200 - Observatory" for more detail of how it works... All images by Peter Bruce Eastchurch Gap. This video sounded better with original Enya music but had to change due to copyright - shame. Images taken with Webcam, Cannon EOS, Starlight Xpress MX7C, Meade DSI 1 & DSI 3 & Astrovid camera's. I wish we could all "see" with our own eyes the pictures shown here but our eyes are not very sensitive at low light levels but what is importance is the fact you can see the sights with a modest set-up. And the night sky is God given and free to view - Best TV in the world...

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 2003 days ago by Ordonomundi

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06:46
06:46
06:46

Hubble Space Telescope - Better Than Ever!

Science & Reason on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/ScienceReason The Hubble Space Telescope Is Back - Better Than Ever! Final Servicing Mission. --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.YouTube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.YouTube.com/ScienceMagazine • http://www.YouTube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.YouTube.com/FFreeThinker --- "Improved Hubble Shows Evidence of Dark Matter" • http://www.youtube.com/user/tdarnell#play/uploads/2/3wluv08tDhU • http://www.deepastronomy.com/ "When Hubble Opened its New Eyes" • http://www.youtube.com/AndromedasWake • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bytNgT7l8k "The Hubble Space Telescope - Rebirth of an Icon (Hubblecast 30)" • http://www.youtube.com/ESOcast • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hjy7YSIH-GI --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a space telescope that was carried into orbit by the space shuttle in April 1990. It is named after the American astronomer Edwin Hubble. Although not the first space telescope, the Hubble is one of the largest and most versatile, and is well-known as both a vital research tool and a public relations boon for astronomy. The HST is a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency, and is one of NASA's Great Observatories, along with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Space telescopes were proposed as early as 1923. The Hubble was funded in the 1970s, with a proposed launch in 1983, but the project was beset by technical delays, budget problems, and the Challenger disaster. When finally launched in 1990, scientists found that the main mirror had been ground incorrectly, severely compromising the telescope's capabilities. However, after a servicing mission in 1993, the telescope was restored to its intended quality. Hubble's orbit outside the distortion of Earth's atmosphere allows it to take extremely sharp images with almost no background light. Hubble's Ultra Deep Field image, for instance, is the most detailed visible-light image ever made of the universe's most distant objects. Many Hubble observations have led to breakthroughs in astrophysics, such as accurately determining the rate of expansion of the universe. The Hubble is the only telescope ever designed to be serviced in space by astronauts. There have been five servicing missions, the last occurring in May 2009. Servicing Mission 1 took place in December 1993 when Hubble's imaging flaw was corrected. Servicing missions 2, 3A, and 3B repaired various sub-systems and replaced many of the observing instruments with more modern and capable versions. However, following the 2003 Space Shuttle Columbia accident, the fifth servicing mission was canceled on safety grounds. After spirited public discussion, NASA reconsidered this decision, and administrator Mike Griffin approved one final Hubble servicing mission. STS-125 was launched in May 2009, and installed two new instruments and made numerous repairs. The latest servicing should allow the telescope to function until at least 2014, when its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), is due to be launched. The JWST will be far superior to Hubble for many astronomical research programs, but will only observe in infrared, so it will complement (not replace) Hubble's ability to observe in the visible and ultraviolet parts of the spectrum. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Space_Telescope .

Channels: Observational astronomy 

Added: 2003 days ago by Ordonomundi

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12:39
12:39
12:39

Telescopes, Galileo to SLOOH

http://slooh.com This video looks at Galileo's important work with the first telescope and includes an overview of the SLOOH robotic telescopes. Robotic telescopes are accessed and controlled using the Internet an incredible evolution of technology from Galileo's first telescopes

Channels: The Astronomers 

Added: 2003 days ago by Ordonomundi

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01:03
01:03
01:03

Gigantic Solar Tornado Is 5 Times the Size of Earth

This enormous tornado erupting from the surface of the sun is big enough to swallow the Earth. In fact, it could swallow five Earths. Discovered using NASA's Solar Dynamic Observatory satellite, this colossal twisting mass is made up of superheated gas at a temperature of between 90,000 and 3.6 million degrees Fahrenheit. Over the course of three hours, this behemoth reached up from the sun's surface to a height of 125,000 miles, or roughly half the distance between the Earth and the moon. The hot gases were whipped up to nearly 186,000 miles per hour. In comparison, the wind speed of terrestrial tornadoes generally reaches a paltry 100 miles per hour. Scientists have previously seen smaller solar tornadoes with other sun-observing satellites but this one — spotted in September 2011 — is thought to be the first one ever filmed (left). Since then, researchers have seen at least one more solar tornado, an Earth-sized twister seen in the video below. These tornadoes often precede events known as coronal mass ejections — huge eruptions of charged particles that blast out of the sun's surface with tremendous energy. Such flare-ups are thought to be related to interactions among the sun's magnetic field lines, whose corkscrewing movements also shape the solar tornado. The top images and movie were presented at the National Astronomy Meeting 2012 in Manchester, England on Mar. 29.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2003 days ago by deek

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00:55
00:55
00:55

NASA Video: Rare giant solar tornado caught on tape

A giant solar tornado - five times the Earth's diameter - swirling at incredible speed of some 186,000 mph has been captured on video by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. ­This is the first time giant solar twister has been caught on video. Solar tornadoes, known as solar prominences, are shaped by the sun's magnetic field and often occur during coronal mass ejections -- huge explosions of solar plasma. The speed of swirling solar gases can sometimes reach several thousand miles per hour. This 124,000-mile-tall tornado was filmed on September 25, 2011, but the video was only released to the public at the National Astronomy Meeting in Manchester (UK) on Thursday. Xing Li, an astronomer at Aberystwyth University in Wales, believes the finding is a "real gem of an event to fire the imagination, and it is a good way to study magnetic structures in the sun's atmosphere." Scientists believe that study of solar tornadoes will help understand the causes of space storms in general, which is still one of the great mysteries of our solar system. RT on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com RT on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2003 days ago by deek

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01:07
01:07
01:07
 
00:55
00:55
00:55

NASA Video Rare giant solar tornado caught on tape

A giant solar tornado - five times the Earth's diameter - swirling at incredible speed of some 186,000 mph has been captured on video by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. ­This is the first time giant solar twister has been caught on video. Solar tornadoes, known as solar prominences, are shaped by the sun's magnetic field and often occur during coronal mass ejections -- huge explosions of solar plasma. The speed of swirling solar gases can sometimes reach several thousand miles per hour. This 124,000-mile-tall tornado was filmed on September 25, 2011, but the video was only released to the public at the National Astronomy Meeting in Manchester (UK) on Thursday. Xing Li, an astronomer at Aberystwyth University in Wales, believes the finding is a "real gem of an event to fire the imagination, and it is a good way to study magnetic structures in the sun's atmosphere." Scientists believe that study of solar tornadoes will help understand the causes of space storms in general, which is still one of the great mysteries of our solar system.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2003 days ago by deek

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02:02
02:02
02:02

SDO: Solar Tornadoes (2012.02.07) [1080p]

Time-lapse animation showing enormous tornado-like vortices on the Sun's limb as seen by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory between 2012-02-07T08:00:00 and 2012-02-08T23:00:00. Each image in this animation was taken at 36 second intervals. credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio source: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?3919

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2003 days ago by deek

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01:07
01:07
01:07

Tornado Season On The Sun?

For a 30 hour spell (Feb 7-8, 2012) the Solar Dynamics Observatory captured plasma caught in a magnetic dance across the Sun's surface. The results closely resemble extreme tornadic activity on Earth. - Original Music by Mark C. Petersen, Loch Ness Productions

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2057 days ago by deek

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02:14
02:14
02:14

Earth Sized Tornado Spins On Sun's Surface Feb-2012.mpg

Vast solar tornado spins on the sun A tremendous tornado whirling across the surface of the sun was captured by a NASA satellite recently -- an amazing wonder of the solar system that may be as big as the Earth itself. The video was recorded by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), a sun-watching satellite that has transmitted a series of stunning photos of solar flares in recent months. The new video shows darker, cooler plasma shifting back and forth above the sun's surface over the span of nearly 30 hours stretching from Feb. 7 to Feb. 8. And the giant tornado may be as large as the Earth itself, with gusts of up to 300,000 mph, explained Terry Kucera, deputy SOHO project scientist and a solar physicist with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/02/17/vast-solar-tornado-spied-on-sun/#ixzz1mfrMpwlP Source http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/02/17/vast-solar-tornado-spied-on-sun/ Related Video Tornado Season On The Sun? Youtube Channel VideoFromSpace http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-zt8qnTcLM&feature=player_embedded About the utube examiner's channel Video's on this channel are under Fair USE Law.17 U.S.C. § 107 Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. § 106 and 17 U.S.C. § 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news. This is what this channel is for Comments on Video subjects.Your Ideas suggestions and thoughts.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2057 days ago by deek

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00:52
00:52
00:52

Huge 'Tornado' Churns on Sun's Surface - Close-Up Video

A circular storm as wide as five Earths was captured churning on the Sun's surface on Sept. 25, 2011, by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft. Time-lapsed multiple filter views are looped in this video. - Original Music by Mark C. Petersen, Loch Ness Productions

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2057 days ago by deek

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00:48
00:48
00:48

Stellar-mass black hole discovered

Our astronomers have detected a stellar-mass black hole in another galaxy, much further away than any other previously known. With a mass above fifteen times that of the sun, this is the second most massive black hole of this type ever discovered. This animation shows how the stellar black hole NGC 300 X-1 might look. Note: there is no audio in this video. Full story at: http://www.shef.ac.uk/mediacentre/2010/1481.html Department of Physics and Astronomy: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/physics/ Credit: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2/P. Crowther/L. Calçada.

Channels: Stellar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:29
00:29
00:29

NASA SDO - X1.9 Class Solar Flare, November 3, 2011.mov

"Bad Boy" active region 1339 continues to flare. At 20:27 UT a solar flare peaked at X1.9. X-class flares are pretty massive and are major events that can trigger planet-wide radio blackouts and long-lasting radiation storms. The location of this sunspot/active region is still not quiet Earth directed. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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04:49
04:49
04:49

NASA SDO - Aurora; What Causes Them?

Aurora are colorful lights in the night time sky primarily appearing in Earth's polar regions. But what causes them? The culprit behind aurora is our own Sun and the solar plasma that is ejected during a magnetic event like a flare or a coronal mass ejection. This plasma travels outward along with the solar wind and when it encounters Earth's magnetic field, it travels down the field lines that connect at the poles. Atoms in the plasma interacts with atoms in Earth's upper atmosphere.

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:28
00:28
00:28

NASA SDO - X2-class Solar Flare, January 27, 2012

Our "bad boy" sunspot 1402 continues to unleash flares. At 18:37 UT this active region produced the largest category of flares; an X-class flare. It measured X2 to be exact. Since this active region is rotating over the limb of the Sun the eruption was not Earth directed. But energetic protons accelerated by the blast are now surrounding our planet and a S1-class radiation storm is in progress. S1-class is the lowest of 5 (S1 to S5) and has no biological impact, no satellite operations are impacted but some minor impact on HF radio is experienced. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:23
00:23
00:23

NASA SDO - Planet-sized Bubbles

An intense solar flare observation by yours truly on October 22, 2011. Especially watch the dark "blobs" falling downward into the flare from above. These are not dense blobs of cool matter - they're actually voids in plasma! Planet-sized bubbles of low density, moving through the 15 million-degree plasma. This warms the cockles of my heart. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:20
00:20
00:20

NASA SDO - Lunar Transit, February 21, 2012

Today we were treated to a very special sight; the Moon came in between the SDO satellite and the Sun. For 1 hour and 41 minutes team SDO observed the Lunar Transit. This event only happens a few times a year but gives the SDO Team an opportunity to better understand the AIA instrument on SDO and give it a fine tune. This video shows today's Lunar Eclipse in a variety of wavelengths the AIA instrument observes. Each wavelength shows us a different temperature and layer of the Sun, allowing us to study the Sun and its activities. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:34
00:34
00:34

NASA SDO - M8.7-class Solar Flare, Jan 23, 2012

The Chinese New Year certainly started with a bang this morning. At approx. 04:00 UT a strong and long duration M8.7-class solar flare exploded from Active Region 1402. NASA SDO captured this event and thanks to ESA/NASA SOHO and NASA STEREO Behind spacecrafts, we have also learned of a very quick moving Coronal Mass Ejection. The CME is traveling at approx. 2,200 km per second and the Goddard Space Weather Lab predicts the arrival of this CME on earth to be January 24, 2012 at approx. 14:18 UT (+/- 7 hours). It also shows that Mars will get hit too, several hours after Earth. These kinds of events can cause problems for spacecrafts in geosynchronous, polar and other orbits passing could be affected by the cloud's arrival. In addition, strong geomagnetic storms are possible, so high-latitude sky watchers should be alert for Aurorae. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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01:30
01:30
01:30

NASA SDO - Large Sunspot AR1339, November 1 - 8, 2011

The black and white images show the magnetic field - the field is pointing toward us where it is white. The leading spots all have an intense negative polarity and the following spots are mostly positive. The two polarities are pretty well separated and fairly stable, which is why this region hasn't produced even more dramatic activity. The biggest explosions happen when complex magnetic regions annihilate each other. The glittering moving features around the spots follow the crests of magnetic waves. Not much new flux is emerging into this mature region, but there is a lot going on in the vicinity - and just about everywhere else too if you look carefully. The surrounding filamentary structures are weaker field regions that appear bright in intensity. The movie with the granular yellow background shows the Sun's surface brightness. Sunspot group 11339 is already large when it rotates around to the front side of the Sun. The umbra is the darker, cooler part where the magnetic field is very strong and vertical. The surrounding orange penumbra appears very dynamic because waves in the weaker horizontal magnetic field make it look like material is flowing out of the spot. Watch how the darkest regions develop in time. The largest spot is more than five times the size of our Earth. What you cannot tell from these pictures is which direction the magnetic field is pointing. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:25
00:25
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NASA SDO - Growing Sunspot

The video from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard SDO shows the Active Region 1393 from January 6 through January 8 and demonstrates how sunspots can quickly change shape and size. Sunspots are planet-sized magnets created by the Sun's inner magnetic dynamo. Like all magnets in the Universe, sunspots have north (N) and south (S) magnetic poles Sunspots, temporary disturbances in the Sun's photosphere, are the most visible advertisement of the solar magnetic field. They appear dark because temperatures are considerably lower than in surrounding areas. Sunspots occur where the magnetic field lines emerge from the inside of the Sun to form expanding loops above its surface. Sunspots usually show up as small forms that are irregularly shaped, and grow within days or weeks to their full size. While they can last weeks or months, they do eventually disappear, often by breaking into smaller and smaller sunspots. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:29
00:29
00:29

NASA SDO - X1.1 Solar Flare, March 5, 2012

After several days of a quiet Sun, the solar activity is now high again. Big sunspot AR1429, which emerged on March 2nd, is crackling with strong flares. This morning brought the strongest so far--an X1-class eruption on March 5th at 0413 UT. This flare propelled a bright Coronal Mass Ejection into Space, which will probably miss Earth, but hit Mercury and Venus. Even if this CME misses, high-latitude sky watchers should still be alert for auroras in the nights ahead. An M2-class eruption from the same sunspot on March 4th produced another, wider CME that might yet intersect Earth. The cloud is expected to deliver a glancing blow to our planet's magnetic field on March 6th at 04:30 UT (+/- 7 hr). Take a look at the forecast from our friends at the NASA Goddard Space Weather Lab: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/downloads/20120305_085600_anim.tim-den.gif Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:13
00:13
00:13

NASA SDO - First Visual of Comet Lovejoy

The Comet Lovejoy seen through the Solar Dynamics Observatory AIA telescope in the 171 angstrom wavelength. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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00:16
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NASA SDO - January 2, 2012 Eruption

An active region just passed the Western limb of the Sun produced a very nice eruption today. Lots of solar material was ejected into Space but it was not Earth directed. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 2060 days ago by deek

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