Deprecated: mysql_connect(): The mysql extension is deprecated and will be removed in the future: use mysqli or PDO instead in /home/theastro/public_html/include/vshare.php on line 7
The Astronomersscott
Videos with tag scott
Results 1-4 of 4
 
00:45
00:45
00:45

NASA | SDO Sees Comet Lovejoy Survive Close Encounter with Sun

One instrument watching for the comet was the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which adjusted its cameras in order to watch the trajectory. Not only does this help with comet research, but it also helps orient instruments on SDO -- since the scientists know where the comet is based on other spacecraft, they can finely determine the position of SDO's mirrors. This first clip from SDO from the evening of Dec 15, 2011 shows Comet Lovejoy moving in toward the sun. Comet Lovejoy survived its encounter with the sun. The second clip shows the comet exiting from behind the right side of the sun, after an hour of travel through its closest approach to the sun. By tracking how the comet interacts with the sun's atmosphere, the corona, and how material from the tail moves along the sun's magnetic field lines, solar scientists hope to learn more about the corona. This movie was filmed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 171 Angstrom wavelength, which is typically shown in yellow. Credit: NASA/SDO This video is public domain. Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1882 days ago by deek

Views: 398 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
02:21
02:21
02:21

NASA | SDO Year One

April 21, 2011 marks the one-year anniversary of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) First Light press conference, where NASA revealed the first images taken by the spacecraft. In the last year, the sun has gone from its quietest period in years to the activity marking the beginning of solar cycle 24. SDO has captured every moment with a level of detail never-before possible. The mission has returned unprecedented images of solar flares, eruptions of prominences, and the early stages of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this video are some of the most beautiful, interesting, and mesmerizing events seen by SDO during its first year. In the order they appear in the video the events are: 1. Prominence Eruption from AIA in 304 Angstroms on March 30, 2010 2. Cusp Flow from AIA in 171 Angstroms on February 14, 2011 3. Prominence Eruption from AIA in 304 Angstroms on February 25, 2011 4. Cusp Flow from AIA in 304 Angstroms on February 14, 2011 5. Merging Sunspots from HMI in Continuum on October 24-28, 2010 6. Prominence Eruption and active region from AIA in 304 Angstroms on April 30, 2010 7. Solar activity and plasma loops from AIA in 171 Angstroms on March 4-8, 2011 8. Flowing plasma from AIA in 304 Angstroms on April 19, 2010 9. Active regions from HMI in Magnetogram on March 10, 2011 10. Filament eruption from AIA in 304 Angstroms on December 6, 2010 11. CME start from AIA in 211 Angstroms on March 8, 2011 12. X2 flare from AIA in 304 Angstroms on February 15, 2011 Be sure to vote on your favorite SDO clip here: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/multimedia/VC-1st-light.html Voting goes from April 21 until May 5. This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10748 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1882 days ago by deek

Views: 619 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
01:20
01:20
01:20

NASA | Massive Solar Flare gets HD Close Up

Take a closer look at the flare that erupted on March 6, 2012. This movie of the March 6, 2012 X5.4 flare was captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in the 171 and 131 Angstrom wavelength. One of the most dramatic features is the way the entire surface of the sun seems to ripple with the force of the eruption. This movement comes from something called EIT waves -- because they were first discovered with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar Heliospheric Observatory. Since SDO captures images every 12 seconds, it has been able to map the full evolution of these waves and confirm that they can travel across the full breadth of the sun. The waves move at over a million miles per hour, zipping from one side of the sun to the other in about an hour. The movie shows two distinct waves. The first seems to spread in all directions; the second is narrower, moving toward the southeast. Such waves are associated with, and perhaps trigger, fast coronal mass ejections, so it is likely that each one is connected to one of the two CMEs that erupted on March 6. Caption: NASA/SDO Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1882 days ago by deek

Views: 436 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated

 
01:01:56
01:01:56
01:01:56

Plasma Physics' Answers to the New Cosmological Questions by Dr. Donald E. Scott - Full Video

NASA Goddard presentation by Dr. Donald E. Scott on plasma cosmology (electric cosmology) Watch an exciting layman's tutorial on plasma cosmology here: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4773590301316220374# Learn more about plasma cosmology here: http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/00current.htm A massive list of reasons why Einstein was wrong and plasma physicists are right: http://knol.google.com/k/einstein-was-wrong-falsifying-observational-evidence-presented#

Channels: Major questions in astronomy 

Added: 1924 days ago by deek

Views: 686 | Comments: 0

Not yet rated