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The Astronomerssunspot
Videos with tag sunspot
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Gigantic Solar Tornado Is 5 Times the Size of Earth--September 2011

Discovered using NASA's Solar Dynamic Observatory satellite, this colossal twisting mass is made up of superheated gas at a temperature of between 90,000 and 3.6 million degrees Fahrenheit. Over the course of three hours, this behemoth reached up from the sun's surface to a height of 125,000 miles, or roughly half the distance between the Earth and the moon. The hot gases were whipped up to nearly 186,000 miles per hour. In comparison, the wind speed of terrestrial tornadoes generally reaches a paltry 100 miles per hour. Scientists have previously seen smaller solar tornadoes with other sun-observing satellites but this one — spotted in September 2011 — is thought to be the first one ever filmed (left). Since then, researchers have seen at least one more solar tornado, an Earth-sized twister seen in the video below. These tornadoes often precede events known as coronal mass ejections — huge eruptions of charged particles that blast out of the sun's surface with tremendous energy. Such flare-ups are thought to be related to interactions among the sun's magnetic field lines, whose corkscrewing movements also shape the solar tornado. The top images and movie were presented at the National Astronomy Meeting 2012 in Manchester, England on Mar. 29. http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/03/gigantic-solar-tornado/ comment-rate-subscribe also watch: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL20C572EB49403155&feature=view_all

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1765 days ago by deek

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NASA SDO - X1.9 Class Solar Flare, November 3, 2011.mov

"Bad Boy" active region 1339 continues to flare. At 20:27 UT a solar flare peaked at X1.9. X-class flares are pretty massive and are major events that can trigger planet-wide radio blackouts and long-lasting radiation storms. The location of this sunspot/active region is still not quiet Earth directed. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1821 days ago by deek

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NASA SDO - Growing Sunspot

The video from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard SDO shows the Active Region 1393 from January 6 through January 8 and demonstrates how sunspots can quickly change shape and size. Sunspots are planet-sized magnets created by the Sun's inner magnetic dynamo. Like all magnets in the Universe, sunspots have north (N) and south (S) magnetic poles Sunspots, temporary disturbances in the Sun's photosphere, are the most visible advertisement of the solar magnetic field. They appear dark because temperatures are considerably lower than in surrounding areas. Sunspots occur where the magnetic field lines emerge from the inside of the Sun to form expanding loops above its surface. Sunspots usually show up as small forms that are irregularly shaped, and grow within days or weeks to their full size. While they can last weeks or months, they do eventually disappear, often by breaking into smaller and smaller sunspots. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1821 days ago by deek

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NASA SDO - Traveling Sunspots (Feb 7 - 20, 2011)

A beautiful video showing a full side to side passing of an active region and the movement of sunspots as seen by the HMI instrument. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager extends the capabilities of the SOHO/MDI instrument with continual full-disk coverage at higher spatial resolution and new vector magnetogram capabilities. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1821 days ago by deek

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NASA SDO - Big Sunspot, Big Effects

This is the sunspot region AR 1429 that generated several major solar storms recently. The video covers nine days (March 4 - 12, 2012). Notice how the spot is almost always changing as its magnetic fields realign themselves. The images are white light images called intensity grams. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1821 days ago by deek

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NASA SDO - Today's Un-Boring Sun; December 7, 2011

December 7, 2011; Today's Sun in various wavelengths showing various temperatures and layers of the Sun. Not only that, but we also added the Sun's magnetic field lines to the view. These images were taken at approx. the same time We start off looking at the 6,000 degrees C. Photosphere. See the various sunspots on the "surface" of the Sun? Now let's transition into the region between the Chromosphere and the Corona, at about 1 million degrees C. From there we go into a composite of three different wavelengths showing temperatures up to 2 million degrees C. And at the end we add the complex field of Magnetic Field lines to the various active regions. And who says the Sun is boring? Credit: NASA SDO Thanks to Steele Hill

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1821 days ago by deek

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NASA SDO - Three in Profile

Three energized active regions that were lined up latitudinally (along a North-South line) rotated into profile view at the Sun's edge and put on a good solar show (Oct. 21-23, 2011). They were observed in extreme ultraviolet light. The magnetic forces of the active regions were feverishly connecting and reconnecting the entire time. Towards the end of the clip, the middle region spurted off a burst of plasma and then the upper one erupted with a flare, followed by cascades of bright loops reorganizing themselves above it. SDO's high resolution images and fast cadence of images let us see a level of detail never before possible. Credit: NASA SDO

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1821 days ago by deek

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Solar Tornado filmed by Nasa's SDO satellite

A rare 'solar tornado', possibly the size of Earth with 300,000mph winds, has been caught on camera by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Report by Sam Datta-Paulin. Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/itn and follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/itn

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1821 days ago by deek

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NASA SDO - X-class Solar Flares & Solar Tsunami, March 7, 2012

On March 7, 2012 just a few minutes after midnight UT time the active region (AR11429) unleashed two strong X-class flare. The first, X5.4-class, showed a very bright flare, the second right after, X1-class, hurled a second coronal mass ejection into Space. Also seen can be a wave going across the Sun at approx. 1,000,000 mph - also known as a Solar Tsunami. Here are various views of this events over a couple of hours, including some close-up views of the Sunspot 1429. Credit: NASA SDO & Dr. A. Kosovichev, HMI

Channels: Solar astronomy 

Added: 1821 days ago by deek

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